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Theaetetus

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Theaetetus by Plato,Bernard Williams,M. J. Levett,Myles Burnyeat Book Summary:

M J Levett's elegant translation of Theaetetus, first published in 1928, is here revised by Myles Burnyeat to reflect contemporary standards of accuracy while retainingn the style, imagery, and idiomatic speech for which the Levett translation is unparalleled. Bernard Williams's concise introduction illuminates the powerful argument of this complex dialogue and illustrates its connections to contemporary metaphysical and epistemological concerns.

Reading Plato's Theaetetus

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Reading Plato's Theaetetus by Timothy D. J. Chappell Book Summary:

This book intersperses philosophical commentary with a new translation of the whole dialogue to present an original case for thinking that Plato's aim in the Theaetetus is to further the cause of his own anti-empiricist theory of knowledge by testing -- and destroying -- a series of empiricist theories of knowledge.

Theaetetus

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Theaetetus by Plato,,John McDowell,Lesley Brown Book Summary:

The Theaetetus is a seminal text in the philosophy of knowledge, acknowledged as one of Plato's finest works. Cast as a conversation between Socrates and a student, Theaetetus, it explores the key philosophical issue: what is knowledge? This new edition combines the acclaimed translation by John McDowell with a valuable introduction and notes.

Theaetetus

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Theaetetus by Plato Plato Book Summary:

Some dialogues of Plato are of so various a character that their relation to the other dialogues cannot be determined with any degree of certainty. The Theaetetus, like the Parmenides, has points of similarity both with his earlier and his later writings. The perfection of style, the humour, the dramatic interest, the complexity of structure, the fertility of illustration, the shifting of the points of view, are characteristic of his best period of authorship. The vain search, the negative conclusion, the figure of the midwives, the constant profession of ignorance on the part of Socrates, also bear the stamp of the early dialogues, in which the original Socrates is not yet Platonized. Had we no other indications, we should be disposed to range the Theaetetus with the Apology and the Phaedrus, and perhaps even with the Protagoras and the Laches.

The Theaetetus of Plato

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Theaetetus of Plato by Plato Book Summary:

Download or read The Theaetetus of Plato book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Plato's Theaetetus

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Plato's Theaetetus by Plato Book Summary:

Theaetetus, the Sophist, and the Statesman are a trilogy of Platonic dialogues that show Socrates formulating his conception of philosophy as he prepares the defense for his trial. Originally published together as The Being of the Beautiful, these translations can be read separately or as a trilogy. Each includes an introduction, extensive notes, and comprehensive commentary that examines the trilogy's motifs and relationships. "Seth Benardete is one of the very few contemporary classicists who combine the highest philological competence with a subtlety and taste that approximate that of the ancients. At the same time, he as set himself the entirely modern hermeneutical task of uncovering what the ancients preferred to keep veiled, of making explicit what they indicated, and hence...of showing the naked ugliness of artificial beauty."—Stanley Rose, Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal Seth Benardete (1930-2001) was professor of classics at New York University. He was the author or translator of many books, most recently The Argument of the Action, Plato's "Laws," and Plato's "Symposium," all published by the University of Chicago Press.

Plato: Theaetetus and Sophist

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Plato: Theaetetus and Sophist by Christopher Rowe Book Summary:

Plato's Theaetetus and Sophist are two of his most important dialogues, and are widely read and discussed by philosophers for what they reveal about his epistemology and particularly his accounts of belief and knowledge. Although they form part of a single Platonic project, these dialogues are not usually presented as a pair, as they are in this new and lively translation. Offering a high standard of accuracy and readability, the translation reveals the continuity between these dialogues and others in the Platonic corpus, especially the Republic. Christopher Rowe's supporting introduction and notes help the reader to follow the arguments as they develop, explaining their structure, context and interpretation. This new edition challenges current scholarly approaches to Plato's work and will pave the way for fresh interpretations both of Theaetetus and Sophist and of Plato's writings in general.

Theaetetus

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Theaetetus by Plato Book Summary:

INTRODUCTION AND ANALYSIS. Some dialogues of Plato are of so various a character that their relation to the other dialogues cannot be determined with any degree of certainty. The Theaetetus, like the Parmenides, has points of similarity both with his earlier and his later writings. The perfection of style, the humour, the dramatic interest, the complexity of structure, the fertility of illustration, the shifting of the points of view, are characteristic of his best period of authorship. The vain search, the negative conclusion, the figure of the midwives, the constant profession of ignorance on the part of Socrates, also bear the stamp of the early dialogues, in which the original Socrates is not yet Platonized. Had we no other indications, we should be disposed to range the Theaetetus with the Apology and the Phaedrus, and perhaps even with the Protagoras and the Laches. But when we pass from the style to an examination of the subject, we trace a connection with the later rather than with the earlier dialogues. In the first place there is the connexion, indicated by Plato himself at the end of the dialogue, with the Sophist, to which in many respects the Theaetetus is so little akin. (1) The same persons reappear, including the younger Socrates, whose name is just mentioned in the Theaetetus;......

The Being of the Beautiful

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The Being of the Beautiful by Plato Book Summary:

The Being of the Beautiful collects Plato’s three dialogues, the Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesmen, in which Socrates formulates his conception of philosophy while preparing for trial. Renowned classicist Seth Benardete’s careful translations clearly illuminate the dramatic and philosophical unity of these dialogues and highlight Plato’s subtle interplay of language and structure. Extensive notes and commentaries, furthermore, underscore the trilogy’s motifs and relationships. “The translations are masterpieces of literalness. . . . They are honest, accurate, and give the reader a wonderful sense of the Greek.”—Drew A. Hyland, Review of Metaphysics

The Theaetetus of Plato

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The Theaetetus of Plato by Plato,Lewis Campbell Book Summary:

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Plato's Theaetetus as a Second Apology

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Plato's Theaetetus as a Second Apology by Zina Giannopoulou Book Summary:

Zina Giannopoulou argues that Theaetetus--Plato's most systematic examination of knowledge--is a philosophically sophisticated elaboration of Apology that successfully differentiates Socrates from the sophists. In Apology Socrates defends his philosophical activity partly by distinguishing it from sophistic practices, and in Theaetetus he enacts this distinction. Whereas sophistic expertise fills others' souls with items ofdubious epistemic quality, Socratic midwifery removes, tests, and discards falsities. Giannopoulou goes on to explore how. in Apology, Socrates claims that his wisdom consists in his awareness of his lack of wisdom, and in Theaetetus hevalidates this claim: his attempt to discover what knowledge is, coupled with his intellectual barrenness, shows both that he does not have what he is looking for and why this is the case.

Theaetetus

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Theaetetus by Plato Πλάτων Book Summary:

Dialogue by Plato.English and Greek texts.

Plato's Theory of Knowledge

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Plato's Theory of Knowledge by Plato Book Summary:

Two masterpieces of Plato's later period. The Theaetetus offers a systematic treatment of the question "What is knowledge?" The Sophist follows Socrates' cross-examination of a self-proclaimed true philosopher.

Gorgias. Philebus. Parmenides. Theaetetus. Sophist. Statesman

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Gorgias. Philebus. Parmenides. Theaetetus. Sophist. Statesman by Plato Book Summary:

Download or read Gorgias. Philebus. Parmenides. Theaetetus. Sophist. Statesman book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Plato: Theaetetus. Sophist

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Plato: Theaetetus. Sophist by Plato Book Summary:

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Parmenides. Theaetetus. Sophist. Statesman. Philebus

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Parmenides. Theaetetus. Sophist. Statesman. Philebus by Plato Book Summary:

Download or read Parmenides. Theaetetus. Sophist. Statesman. Philebus book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Philosophy and Knowledge

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Philosophy and Knowledge by Ronald M. Polansky Book Summary:

The Theaetetus provides Plato's fullest discussion of human knowledge and is a rich vehicle for reflection upon its topic. Polansky's commentary demonstrates that the dialogue in fact holds the complete Platonic account of knowledge -- an account which is as sophisticated as any offered by contemporary philosophers.

Plato's >Theaetetus

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Plato's >Theaetetus by Beatriz Bossi,Thomas M. Robinson Book Summary:

This collection of articles by prestigious scholars sheds new light on the main problems of the dialogue, such as the dramatis personae, the refutative strategy, perception and Platoʼs criticism of Heraclitus and Protagoras, the relation between kn

Theaetetus

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Theaetetus by N.A Book Summary:

Scene: Euclid and Terpsion meet in front of Euclid's house in Megara; they enter the house, and the dialogue is read to them by a servant.Euclid. Have you only just arrived from the country, Terpsion?Terpsion. No, I came some time ago: and I have been in the Agora looking for you, and wondering that I could not find you.Euc. But I was not in the city.Terp. Where then?Euc. As I was going down to the harbour, I met Theaetetus-he was being carried up to Athens from the army at Corinth.Terp. Was he alive or dead?Euc. He was scarcely alive, for he has been badly wounded; but he was suffering even more from the sickness which has broken out in the army.Terp. The dysentery, you mean?Euc. Yes.Terp. Alas! what a loss he will be!Euc. Yes, Terpsion, he is a noble fellow; only to-day I heard some people highly praising his behaviour in this very battle.Terp. No wonder; I should rather be surprised at hearing anything else of him. But why did he go on, instead of stopping at Megara?Euc. He wanted to get home: although I entreated and advised him to remain he would not listen to me; so I set him on his way, and turned back, and then I remembered what Socrates had said of him, and thought how remarkably this, like all his predictions, had been fulfilled. I believe that he had seen him a little before his own death, when Theaetetus was a youth, and he had a memorable conversation with him, which he repeated to me when I came to Athens; he was full of admiration of his genius, and said that he would most certainly be a great man, if he lived.

The Rational Enterprise

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The Rational Enterprise by Rosemary Desjardins Book Summary:

"Desjardins' conclusion, that the Theaetetus really does point to a particular theory of knowledge, certainly will be controversial, since for many people the idea that the Theaetetus fails to define knowledge is the cornerstone of their interpretation of Plato's later philosophical thought. But whatever one thinks about the conclusion, it must be agreed that the manner in which it is defended is intrinsically important. Desjardins starts from the unassailable premise that the dialogues are internally unified, and that everything in the dialogues is there for a reason. Her method, then, is to show how some of the features of the dialogue that are usually not taken very seriously actually are very important. Of course, she is not the only scholar taking this sort of tack, but what she makes of the various elements of the Theaetetus is a most impressive construction.

The Essence of Truth

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The Essence of Truth by Martin Heidegger Book Summary:

The Essence of Truth must count as one of Heidegger's most important works, for nowhere else does he give a comparably thorough explanation of what is arguably the most fundamental and abiding theme of his entire philosophy, namely the difference between truth as the "unhiddenness of beings" and truth as the "correctness of propositions". For Heidegger, it is by neglecting the former primordial concept of truth in favor of the latter derivative concept that Western philosophy, beginning already with Plato, took off on its "metaphysical" course towards the bankruptcy of the present day. This first ever translation into English consists of a lecture course delivered by Heidegger at the University of Freiburg in 1931-32. Part One of the course provides a detailed analysis of Plato's allegory of the cave in the Republic, while Part Two gives a detailed exegesis and interpretation of a central section of Plato's Theaetetus, and is essential for the full understanding of his later well-known essay Plato's Doctrine of Truth. As always with Heidegger's writings on the Greeks, the point of his interpretative method is to bring to light the original meaning of philosophical concepts, especially to free up these concepts to their intrinsic power.

The Theaetetus of Plato

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The Theaetetus of Plato by Plato,Samuel Walter 1862- Dyde Book Summary:

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Theaetetus of Plato

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Theaetetus of Plato by Plato Samuel Walters Dyde Book Summary:

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Evolution of the Euclidean Elements

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The Evolution of the Euclidean Elements by W.R. Knorr Book Summary:

The present work has three principal objectives: (1) to fix the chronology of the development of the pre-Euclidean theory of incommensurable magnitudes beginning from the first discoveries by fifth-century Pythago reans, advancing through the achievements of Theodorus of Cyrene, Theaetetus, Archytas and Eudoxus, and culminating in the formal theory of Elements X; (2) to correlate the stages of this developing theory with the evolution of the Elements as a whole; and (3) to establish that the high standards of rigor characteristic of this evolution were intrinsic to the mathematicians' work. In this third point, we wish to counterbalance a prevalent thesis that the impulse toward mathematical rigor was purely a response to the dialecticians' critique of foundations; on the contrary, we shall see that not until Eudoxus does there appear work which may be described as purely foundational in its intent. Through the examination of these problems, the present work will either alter or set in a new light virtually every standard thesis about the fourth-century Greek geometry. I. THE PRE-EUCLIDEAN THEORY OF INCOMMENSURABLE MAGNITUDES The Euclidean theory of incommensurable magnitudes, as preserved in Book X of the Elements, is a synthetic masterwork. Yet there are detect able seams in its structure, seams revealed both through terminology and through the historical clues provided by the neo-Platonist commentator Proclus.

The Midwife of Platonism

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The Midwife of Platonism by David Sedley Book Summary:

Plato's Theaetetus is an acknowledged masterpiece, and among the most influential texts in the history of epistemology. Since antiquity it has been debated whether this dialogue was written by Plato to support his familiar metaphysical doctrines, or represents a self-distancing from these. David Sedley's book offers a via media, founded on a radical separation of the author, Plato, from his main speaker, Socrates. The dialogue, it is argued, is addressed to readers familiar with Plato's mature doctrines, and sets out to show how these doctrines, far from being an abandonment of his Socratic heritage, are its natural outcome. The Socrates portrayed here is the same Socrates as already portrayed in Plato's early dialogues. While not a Platonist, he is exhibited - to put it in terms of an image made famous by this dialogue - as having been Platonism's midwife. In a comprehensive rereading of the text, Sedley tracks the ways in which Socrates is shown unwittingly preparing the ground for Plato's mature doctrines, and reinterprets the dialogue's individual arguments from this perspective. The book is addressed to all readers interested in Plato, and does not require knowledge of Greek.

Theaetetus Plato Illustrated

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Theaetetus Plato Illustrated by Benjamin Jowett Book Summary:

Socrates asks Theodorus if he knows of any geometry students who show particular promise. Theodorus assures him that he does, but that he does not want to over-praise the boy, lest anyone suspect he is in love with him. He says that the boy, Theaetetus, is a young Socrates look-alike, rather homely, with a snub-nose and protruding eyes. The two older men spot Theaetetus rubbing himself down with oil, and Theodorus reviews the facts about him, that he is intelligent, virile, and an orphan whose inheritance has been squandered by trustees.Socrates tells Theaetetus that he cannot make out what knowledge is, and is looking for a simple formula for it. Theaetetus says he really has no idea how to answer the question, and Socrates tells him that he is there to help. Socrates says he has modelled his career after his midwife mother. She delivered babies and for his part, Socrates can tell when a young man is in the throes of trying to give birth to a thought. Socrates considers his philosophical work as midwifery (Maieutics). This method, later also called Socratic method,

Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues

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Form and Good in Plato's Eleatic Dialogues by Kenneth Dorter Book Summary:

00 In this innovative analysis, Plato's four eleatic dialogues are treated as a continuous argument. In Kenneth Dorter's view, Plato reconsiders the theory of forms propounded in his earlier dialogues and through an examination of the theory's limitations reaffirms and proves it essential. Contradicted are both those philosophers who argue that Plato espoused his theory of forms uncritically and those who argue that Plato in some sense rejected the theory and moved toward the categorical analysis developed byAristotle. Dorter's reexamination of Plato's insights implies an important new direction for modern philosophical inquiry. In this innovative analysis, Plato's four eleatic dialogues are treated as a continuous argument. In Kenneth Dorter's view, Plato reconsiders the theory of forms propounded in his earlier dialogues and through an examination of the theory's limitations reaffirms and proves it essential. Contradicted are both those philosophers who argue that Plato espoused his theory of forms uncritically and those who argue that Plato in some sense rejected the theory and moved toward the categorical analysis developed byAristotle. Dorter's reexamination of Plato's insights implies an important new direction for modern philosophical inquiry.

Towards the Horizon of Knowledge

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Towards the Horizon of Knowledge by Muus Gerrit Jan Beets Book Summary:

Download or read Towards the Horizon of Knowledge book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Philosophy in Dialogue

Theaetetus [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Philosophy in Dialogue by Gary Alan Scott Book Summary:

Traditional Plato scholarship, in the English-speaking world, has assumed that Platonic dialogues are merely collections of arguments. Inevitably, the question arises: If Plato wanted to present collections of arguments, why did he write dialogues instead of treatises? Concerned about this question, some scholars have been experimenting with other, more contextualized ways of reading the dialogues. This anthology is among the first to present these new approaches as pursued by a variety of scholars. As such, it offers new perspectives on Plato as well as a suggestive view of Plato scholarship as something of a laboratory for historians of philosophy generally. The essays gathered here each examine vital aspects of Plato’s many methods, considering his dialogues in relation to Thucydides and Homer, narrative strategies and medical practice, images and metaphors. They offer surprising new research into such much-studied works as The Republic as well as revealing views of lesser-known dialogues like the Cratylus and Philebus. With reference to thinkers such as Heidegger, Gadamer, and Sartre, the authors place the Platonic dialogues in an illuminating historical context. Together, their essays should reinvigorate the scholarly examination of the way Plato’s dialogues “work”—and should prompt a reconsideration of how the form of Plato’s philosophical writing bears on the Platonic conception of philosophy.