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Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America

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Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

The United States originated as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Historian Kirk Savage explores how that history of slavery and its violent end was recognized in public--specifically in the sculptural monuments that dominated streets, parks, and town squares in 19th-century America. 67 photos.

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

The United States began as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves explores how the history of slavery and its violent end was told in public spaces—specifically in the sculptural monuments that came to dominate streets, parks, and town squares in nineteenth-century America. Looking at monuments built and unbuilt, Kirk Savage shows how the greatest era of monument building in American history took place amid struggles over race, gender, and collective memory. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves probes a host of fascinating questions and remains the only sustained investigation of post-Civil War monument building as a process of national and racial definition. Featuring a new preface by the author that reflects on recent events surrounding the meaning of these monuments, and new photography and illustrations throughout, this new and expanded edition reveals how monuments exposed the myth of a "united" people, and have only become more controversial with the passage of time.

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

The United States of America originated as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves explores how that history of slavery and its violent end was told in public space--specifically in the sculptural monuments that increasingly came to dominate streets, parks, and town squares in nineteenth-century America. Here Kirk Savage shows how the greatest era of monument building in American history arose amidst struggles over race, gender, and collective memory. As men and women North and South fought to define the war's legacy in monumental art, they reshaped the cultural landscape of American nationalism. At the same time that the Civil War challenged the nation to reexamine the meaning of freedom, Americans began to erect public monuments as never before. Savage studies this extraordinary moment in American history when a new interracial order seemed to be on the horizon, and when public sculptors tried to bring that new order into concrete form. Looking at monuments built and unbuilt, Savage shows how an old image of black slavery was perpetuated while a new image of the common white soldier was launched in public space. Faced with the challenge of Reconstruction, the nation ultimately recast itself in the mold of the ordinary white man. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves, the first sustained investigation of monument building as a process of national and racial definition, probes a host of fascinating questions: How was slavery to be explained without exploding the myth of a "united" people? How did notions of heroism become racialized? And more generally, who is represented in and by monumental space? How are particular visions of history constructed by public monuments? Written in an engaging fashion, this book will appeal to a wide range of readers interested in American culture, race relations, and public art.

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

The United States originated as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Historian Kirk Savage explores how that history of slavery and its violent end was recognized in public--specifically in the sculptural monuments that dominated streets, parks, and town squares in 19th-century America. 67 photos.

Monument Wars

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Monument Wars by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

Kirk Savage explores the National Mall in Washington D.C., site of some of the most important & poignant memorials in the U.S. He shows how the idea of monument has changed over the decades, & how the 19th century concept of the monument has given way to the late 20th century idea of 'space', the monument as an experience.

The Nineteenth-century Visual Culture Reader

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Nineteenth-century Visual Culture Reader by Margaret Cohen,Anne Higonnet,Charles Baudelaire,Karl Marx,Sigmund Freud,Georg Simmel,Alois Riegl,Siegfried Kracauer,Walter Benjamin,Michel Foucault,Gisèle Freund,Timothy J. Clark,Wolfgang Schivelbusch,Tom Gunning,Tony Bennett,James R. Ryan,Erika Diane Rappaport,Carl E. Schorske,David M. Henkin,Judith R. Walkowitz,David Nye,Jennifer A. Watts,Pierre Nora,Maurice Samuels,Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby,Kirk Savage,Joy S. Kasson,Linda Nochlin,S. Hollis Clayson,Eric Ames,Marcus Verhagen,Lisa Tickner,Sharon Marcus,Shawn Michelle Smith,Debora Leah Silverman Book Summary:

The nineteenth century is central to contemporary discussions of visual culture. This reader brings together key writings on the period, exploring such topics as photographs, exhibitions and advertising.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Journal of the Civil War Era by William A. Blair Book Summary:

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 3, Number 1 March 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Editor's Note William Blair Articles Amber D. Moulton Closing the "Floodgate of Impurity": Moral Reform, Antislavery, and Interracial Marriage in Antebellum Massachusetts Marc-William Palen The Civil War's Forgotten Transatlantic Tariff Debate and the Confederacy's Free Trade Diplomacy Joy M. Giguere "The Americanized Sphinx": Civil War Commemoration, Jacob Bigelow, and the Sphinx at Mount Auburn Cemetery Review Essay Enrico Dal Lago Lincoln, Cavour, and National Unification: American Republicanism and Italian Liberal Nationalism in Comparative Perspective Professional Notes James J. Broomall The Interpretation Is A-Changin': Memory, Museums, and Public History in Central Virginia Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.

Arranging Grief

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Arranging Grief by Dana Luciano Book Summary:

2008 Winner, MLA First Book Prize Charting the proliferation of forms of mourning and memorial across a century increasingly concerned with their historical and temporal significance, Arranging Grief offers an innovative new view of the aesthetic, social, and political implications of emotion. Dana Luciano argues that the cultural plotting of grief provides a distinctive insight into the nineteenth-century American temporal imaginary, since grief both underwrote the social arrangements that supported the nation’s standard chronologies and sponsored other ways of advancing history. Nineteenth-century appeals to grief, as Luciano demonstrates, diffused modes of “sacred time” across both religious and ostensibly secular frameworks, at once authorizing and unsettling established schemes of connection to the past and the future. Examining mourning manuals, sermons, memorial tracts, poetry, and fiction by Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Apess, James Fenimore Cooper, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Susan Warner, Harriet E. Wilson, Herman Melville, Frances E. W. Harper, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Elizabeth Keckley, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, Luciano illustrates the ways that grief coupled the affective body to time. Drawing on formalist, Foucauldian, and psychoanalytic criticism, Arranging Grief shows how literary engagements with grief put forth ways of challenging deep-seated cultural assumptions about history, progress, bodies, and behaviors.

Excel HSC Modern History

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Excel HSC Modern History by Ronald E. Ringer Book Summary:

It contains: an introductory section including how to us e the book and an explanation of the new course reference to th e syllabus outcomes to ensure you cover all course requirements comprehensive coverage of the HSC core topics and the most popular Opti on topics: practice questions to test your understanding of each topic a practice HSC exam paper with comprehensive answer section a glossary of key terms and events a biography of leading historical figures a list of useful websites

The South Vs. The South

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The South Vs. The South by William W. Freehling Book Summary:

Why did the Confederacy lose the Civil War? Most historians point to the larger number of Union troops, for example, or the North's greater industrial might. Now, in The South Vs. the South, one of America's leading authorities on the Civil War era offers an entirely new answer to this question. William Freehling argues that anti-Confederate Southerners--specifically, border state whites and southern blacks--helped cost the Confederacy the war. White men in such border states as Missouri, Kentucky, and Maryland, Freehling points out, were divided in their loyalties--but far more joined the Union army (or simply stayed home) than marched off in Confederate gray. If they had enlisted as rebel troops in the same proportion as white men did farther south, their numbers would have offset all the Confederate casualties during four years of war. In addition, when those states stayed loyal, the vast majority of the South's urban population and industrial capacity remained in Union hands. And many forget, Freehling writes, that the slaves' own decisions led to a series of white decisions (culminating in the Emancipation Proclamation) that turned federal forces into an army of liberation, depriving the South of labor and adding essential troops to the blue ranks. Whether revising our conception of slavery or of Abraham Lincoln, or establishing the antecedents of Martin Luther King, or analyzing Union military strategy, or uncovering new meanings in what is arguably America's greatest piece of sculpture, Augustus St.-Gaudens' Shaw Memorial, Freehling writes with piercing insight and rhetorical verve. Concise and provocative, The South Vs. the South will forever change the way we view the Civil War.

Southeastern Geographer

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Southeastern Geographer by David M. Cochran Jr.,Carl A. Reese Book Summary:

Table of Contents for Volume 52, Number 4 (Winter 2012) Special Issue: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Guest Editor: Chris W. Post Cover Art The Mule Pull at the Mississippi Pecan Festival Joseph S. Miller Introduction: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Chris W. Post Part I: Papers ''History by the Spoonful'' in North Carolina: The Textual Politics of State Highway Historical Markers Derek H. Alderman Remembrance and Place-Making: Teaching Students to Look Ahead While Looking Back Stephen S. Birdsall Editing Memory and Automobility & Race: Two Learning Activities on Contested Heritage and Place Kenneth E. Foote A Tale of Two Civil War Statues: Teaching the Geographies of Memory and Heritage in Norfolk, Virginia Jonathan I. Leib Objectives and Prospects for Bringing Service-Learning into the Memory and Heritage Classroom Chris W. Post Making Memory, Making Landscapes: Classroom Applications of Parallel Trends in the Study of Landscape, Memory, and Learning Owen J. Dwyer and Matthew McCourt Part II: Geographical Notes A Tribute to Dr. Louis De Vorsey, Jr. (1929–2012) Sanford H. Bederman Part III: Reviews From Chicaza to Chickasaw: The European Invasion and the Transformation of the Mississippian World, 1540–1715 Robbie Ethridge Reviewed by Craig S. Revels Key Methods in Geography Nicholas Clifford, Shaun French, and Gill Valentine (Editors) Reviewed by Bandana Kar

Mortal Remains

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Mortal Remains by Nancy Isenberg,Andrew Burstein Book Summary:

Mortal Remains introduces new methods of analyzing death and its crucial meanings over a 240-year period, from 1620 to 1860, untangling its influence on other forms of cultural expression, from religion and politics to race relations and the nature of war. In this volume historians and literary scholars join forces to explore how, in a medically primitive and politically evolving environment, mortality became an issue that was inseparable from national self-definition. Attempting to make sense of their suffering and loss while imagining a future of cultural permanence and spiritual value, early Americans crafted metaphors of death in particular ways that have shaped the national mythology. As the authors show, the American fascination with murder, dismembered bodies, and scenes of death, the allure of angel sightings, the rural cemetery movement, and the enshrinement of George Washington as a saintly father, constituted a distinct sensibility. Moreover, by exploring the idea of the vanishing Indian and the brutality of slavery, the authors demonstrate how a culture of violence and death had an early effect on the American collective consciousness. Mortal Remains draws on a range of primary sources—from personal diaries and public addresses, satire and accounts of sensational crime—and makes a needed contribution to neglected aspects of cultural history. It illustrates the profound ways in which experiences with death and the imagery associated with it became enmeshed in American society, politics, and culture.

Lincoln’s Proclamation

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Lincoln’s Proclamation by William A. Blair,Karen Fisher Younger Book Summary:

The Emancipation Proclamation, widely remembered as the heroic act that ended slavery, in fact freed slaves only in states in the rebellious South. True emancipation was accomplished over a longer period and by several means. Essays by eight distinguished contributors consider aspects of the president's decision making, as well as events beyond Washington, offering new insights on the consequences and legacies of freedom, the engagement of black Americans in their liberation, and the issues of citizenship and rights that were not decided by Lincoln's document. The essays portray emancipation as a product of many hands, best understood by considering all the actors, the place, and the time. The contributors are William A. Blair, Richard Carwardine, Paul Finkelman, Louis Gerteis, Steven Hahn, Stephanie McCurry, Mark E. Neely Jr., Michael Vorenberg, and Karen Fisher Younger.

Monuments and Memory, Made and Unmade

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Monuments and Memory, Made and Unmade by Robert S. Nelson,Margaret Olin Book Summary:

How do some monuments become so socially powerful that people seek to destroy them? After ignoring monuments for years, why must we now commemorate public trauma, but not triumph, with a monument? To explore these and other questions, Robert S. Nelson and Margaret Olin assembled essays from leading scholars about how monuments have functioned throughout the world and how globalization has challenged Western notions of the "monument." Examining how monuments preserve memory, these essays demonstrate how phenomena as diverse as ancient drum towers in China and ritual whale-killings in the Pacific Northwest serve to represent and negotiate time. Connecting that history to the present with an epilogue on the World Trade Center, Monuments and Memory, Made and Unmade is pertinent not only for art historians but for anyone interested in the turbulent history of monuments—a history that is still very much with us today. Contributors: Stephen Bann, Jonathan Bordo, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Jas Elsner, Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Robert S. Nelson, Margaret Olin, Ruth B. Phillips, Mitchell Schwarzer, Lillian Lan-ying Tseng, Richard Wittman, Wu Hung

The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History by Gary W. Gallagher,Alan T. Nolan Book Summary:

A “well-reasoned and timely” (Booklist) essay collection interrogates the Lost Cause myth in Civil War historiography. Was the Confederacy doomed from the start in its struggle against the superior might of the Union? Did its forces fight heroically against all odds for the cause of states’ rights? In reality, these suggestions are an elaborate and intentional effort on the part of Southerners to rationalize the secession and the war itself. Unfortunately, skillful propagandists have been so successful in promoting this romanticized view that the Lost Cause has assumed a life of its own. Misrepresenting the war’s true origins and its actual course, the myth of the Lost Cause distorts our national memory. In The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History, nine historians describe and analyze the Lost Cause, identifying ways in which it falsifies history—creating a volume that makes a significant contribution to Civil War historiography. “The Lost Cause . . . is a tangible and influential phenomenon in American culture and this book provides an excellent source for anyone seeking to explore its various dimensions.” —Southern Historian

Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory by Owen J. Dwyer,Derek H. Alderman Book Summary:

"Owen Dwyer and Derek Alderman examine civil rights memorials as cultural landscapes, offering the first book-length critical reading of the monuments, museums, parts, streets, and sites dedicated to the African-American struggle for civil rights and interpreting them is the context of the Movement's broader history and its current scene. In paying close attention to which stories, people, and places are remembered and which are forgotten, the authors present an engaging account of an unforgettable story."--BOOK JACKET.

The Lincoln Memorial & American Life

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Lincoln Memorial & American Life by Christopher A. Thomas Book Summary:

"Because the idea of a memorial to Lincoln raised questions of race, the legacy of the Civil War, and lingering sectional animosities, the project sparked political debate between the legislative and executive branches of government and between political parties. Thomas traces the long and controversial path of the project, ranging from the immediate aftermath of the Civil War through the Progressive era, with its mix of novelty, racism, and imperialism.

Washington History

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Washington History by N.A Book Summary:

Download or read Washington History book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Where These Memories Grow

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Where These Memories Grow by William Fitzhugh Brundage Book Summary:

"Fresh and innovative perspectives on how southerners across two centuries and from Texas to North Carolina have interpreted their past." The section on Charleston focuses primarily on three women: historic preservationists Susan Pringle Frost and Nell McColl Pringle and visual artist Alice Ravenel Huger Smith.--Cover.