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Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America

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Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

The United States originated as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Historian Kirk Savage explores how that history of slavery and its violent end was recognized in public--specifically in the sculptural monuments that dominated streets, parks, and town squares in 19th-century America. 67 photos.

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

The United States began as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves explores how the history of slavery and its violent end was told in public spaces—specifically in the sculptural monuments that came to dominate streets, parks, and town squares in nineteenth-century America. Looking at monuments built and unbuilt, Kirk Savage shows how the greatest era of monument building in American history took place amid struggles over race, gender, and collective memory. Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves probes a host of fascinating questions and remains the only sustained investigation of post-Civil War monument building as a process of national and racial definition. Featuring a new preface by the author that reflects on recent events surrounding the meaning of these monuments, and new photography and illustrations throughout, this new and expanded edition reveals how monuments exposed the myth of a "united" people, and have only become more controversial with the passage of time.

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Standing Soldiers, Kneeling Slaves by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

The United States originated as a slave society, holding millions of Africans and their descendants in bondage, and remained so until a civil war took the lives of a half million soldiers, some once slaves themselves. Historian Kirk Savage explores how that history of slavery and its violent end was recognized in public--specifically in the sculptural monuments that dominated streets, parks, and town squares in 19th-century America. 67 photos.

Monument Wars

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Monument Wars by Kirk Savage Book Summary:

Kirk Savage explores the National Mall in Washington D.C., site of some of the most important & poignant memorials in the U.S. He shows how the idea of monument has changed over the decades, & how the 19th century concept of the monument has given way to the late 20th century idea of 'space', the monument as an experience.

Written in Stone

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Written in Stone by Sanford Levinson Book Summary:

Is it "Stalinist" for a formerly communist country to tear down a statue of Stalin? Should the Confederate flag be allowed to fly over the South Carolina state capitol? Is it possible for America to honor General Custer and the Sioux Nation, Jefferson Davis and Abraham Lincoln? Indeed, can a liberal, multicultural society memorialize anyone at all, or is it committed to a strict neutrality about the quality of the lives led by its citizens? In Written in Stone, legal scholar Sanford Levinson considers the tangled responses of ever-changing societies to the monuments and commemorations created by past regimes or outmoded cultural and political systems. Drawing on examples from Albania to Zimbabwe, from Moscow to Managua, and paying particular attention to examples throughout the American South, Levinson looks at social and legal arguments regarding the display, construction, modification, and destruction of public monuments. He asks what kinds of claims the past has on the present, particularly if the present is defined in dramatic opposition to its past values. In addition, he addresses the possibilities for responding to the use and abuse of public spaces and explores how a culture might memorialize its historical figures and events in ways that are beneficial to all its members. Written in Stone is a meditation on how national cultures have been or may yet be defined through the deployment of public monuments. It adds a thoughtful and crucial voice into debates surrounding historical accuracy and representation, and will be welcomed by the many readers concerned with such issues.

Monuments and memory

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Monuments and memory by Martha K. Norkunas Book Summary:

At the center of Martha Norkunas's narrative is her intimate connection to the city of Lowell, Massachusetts through her family's rich history. She looks for the interplay of the personal and public, singular and collective memory and history through Lowell's public spaces, always examining where her personal memory converges with the history of the city.

Child of the Fire

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Child of the Fire by Kirsten Buick Book Summary:

Child of the Fire is the first book-length examination of the career of the nineteenth-century artist Mary Edmonia Lewis, best known for her sculptures inspired by historical and biblical themes. Throughout this richly illustrated study, Kirsten Pai Buick investigates how Lewis and her work were perceived, and their meanings manipulated, by others and the sculptor herself. She argues against the racialist art discourse that has long cast Lewis’s sculptures as reflections of her identity as an African American and Native American woman who lived most of her life abroad. Instead, by seeking to reveal Lewis’s intentions through analyses of her career and artwork, Buick illuminates Lewis’s fraught but active participation in the creation of a distinct “American” national art, one dominated by themes of indigeneity, sentimentality, gender, and race. In so doing, she shows that the sculptor variously complicated and facilitated the dominant ideologies of the vanishing American (the notion that Native Americans were a dying race), sentimentality, and true womanhood. Buick considers the institutions and people that supported Lewis’s career—including Oberlin College, abolitionists in Boston, and American expatriates in Italy—and she explores how their agendas affected the way they perceived and described the artist. Analyzing four of Lewis’s most popular sculptures, each created between 1866 and 1876, Buick discusses interpretations of Hiawatha in terms of the cultural impact of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s epic poem The Song of Hiawatha; Forever Free and Hagar in the Wilderness in light of art historians’ assumptions that artworks created by African American artists necessarily reflect African American themes; and The Death of Cleopatra in relation to broader problems of reading art as a reflection of identity.

Monuments

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Monuments by Judith Dupré Book Summary:

A leading architectural historian examines more than three dozen notable American monuments, including the Alamo, Gettysburg, Mount Rushmore, and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and offers interviews with architects and other information.

Carried to the Wall

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Carried to the Wall by Kristin Ann Hass Book Summary:

On May 9, 1990, a bottle of Jack Daniels, a ring with letter, a Purple Heart and Bronze Star, a baseball, a photo album, an ace of spades, and a pie were some of the objects left at the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial. For Kristin Hass, this eclectic sampling represents an attempt by ordinary Americans to come to terms with a multitude of unnamed losses as well as to take part in the ongoing debate of how this war should be remembered. Hass explores the restless memory of the Vietnam War and an American public still grappling with its commemoration. In doing so it considers the ways Americans have struggled to renegotiate the meanings of national identity, patriotism, community, and the place of the soldier, in the aftermath of a war that ruptured the ways in which all of these things have been traditionally defined. Hass contextualizes her study of this phenomenon within the history of American funerary traditions (in particular non-Anglo traditions in which material offerings are common), the history of war memorials, and the changing symbolic meaning of war. Her evocative analysis of the site itself illustrates and enriches her larger theses regarding the creation of public memory and the problem of remembering war and the resulting causalities—in this case not only 58,000 soldiers, but also conceptions of masculinity, patriotism, and working-class pride and idealism.

A People at War

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

A People at War by Scott Reynolds Nelson,Carol Sheriff Book Summary:

Claiming more than 600,000 lives, the American Civil War had a devastating impact on countless numbers of common soldiers and civilians, even as it brought freedom to millions. This book shows how average Americans coped with despair as well as hope during this vast upheaval. A People at War brings to life the full humanity of the war's participants, from women behind their plows to their husbands in army camps; from refugees from slavery to their former masters; from Mayflower descendants to freshly recruited Irish sailors. We discover how people confronted their own feelings about the war itself, and how they coped with emotional challenges (uncertainty, exhaustion, fear, guilt, betrayal, grief) as well as physical ones (displacement, poverty, illness, disfigurement). The book explores the violence beyond the battlefield, illuminating the sharp-edged conflicts of neighbor against neighbor, whether in guerilla warfare or urban riots. The authors travel as far west as China and as far east as Europe, taking us inside soldiers' tents, prisoner-of-war camps, plantations, tenements, churches, Indian reservations, and even the cargo holds of ships. They stress the war years, but also cast an eye at the tumultuous decades that preceded and followed the battlefield confrontations. An engrossing account of ordinary people caught up in life-shattering circumstances, A People at War captures how the Civil War rocked the lives of rich and poor, black and white, parents and children--and how all these Americans pushed generals and presidents to make the conflict a people's war.

The Nineteenth-century Visual Culture Reader

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Nineteenth-century Visual Culture Reader by Margaret Cohen,Anne Higonnet,Charles Baudelaire,Karl Marx,Sigmund Freud,Georg Simmel,Alois Riegl,Siegfried Kracauer,Walter Benjamin,Michel Foucault,Gisèle Freund,Timothy J. Clark,Wolfgang Schivelbusch,Tom Gunning,Tony Bennett,James R. Ryan,Erika Diane Rappaport,Carl E. Schorske,David M. Henkin,Judith R. Walkowitz,David Nye,Jennifer A. Watts,Pierre Nora,Maurice Samuels,Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby,Kirk Savage,Joy S. Kasson,Linda Nochlin,S. Hollis Clayson,Eric Ames,Marcus Verhagen,Lisa Tickner,Sharon Marcus,Shawn Michelle Smith,Debora Leah Silverman Book Summary:

The nineteenth century is central to contemporary discussions of visual culture. This reader brings together key writings on the period, exploring such topics as photographs, exhibitions and advertising.

Races of Mankind

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Races of Mankind by Marianne Kinkel Book Summary:

In 1930, Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History commissioned sculptor Malvina Hoffman to produce three-dimensional models of racial types for an anthropology display called the Races of Mankind. In this exceptional study, Marianne Kinkel measures the colossal impact of the ninety-one bronze and stone sculptures on perceptions of race in twentieth-century visual culture, tracing their exhibition from their 1933 debut and nearly four decades at the Field Museum to numerous reuses, repackagings, reproductions, and publications that reached across the world. Employing a keen interdisciplinary approach, Kinkel taps archival sources and period publications to construct a cultural biography of the Races of Mankind sculptures. She examines how Hoffman's collaborations with curators and anthropologists transformed the commission from a traditional physical anthropology display to a fine art exhibit. She also tracks influential exhibitions of statuettes in New York and Paris and photographic reproductions in atlases, maps, and encyclopedias. The volume concludes with the dismantling of the exhibit at the Field Museum in the late 1960s and the redeployment of some of the sculptures in new educational settings. Kinkel demonstrates how the Races of Mankind sculptures participated in various racial paradigms by asserting fixed racial types and racial hierarchies in the 1930s, promoting the notion of a Brotherhood of Man in the 1940s, and engaging Afrocentric discourses of identity in the 1970s. Despite the enormous role the sculptures played in representing race in American visual culture, their history has been largely unrecognized until now. The first sustained examination of this influential group of sculptures, Races of Mankind: The Sculptures of Malvina Hoffman examines how the veracity of race is continually renegotiated through collaborative processes involved in the production, display, and circulation of visual representations.

The Lincoln Memorial & American Life

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Lincoln Memorial & American Life by Christopher A. Thomas Book Summary:

"Because the idea of a memorial to Lincoln raised questions of race, the legacy of the Civil War, and lingering sectional animosities, the project sparked political debate between the legislative and executive branches of government and between political parties. Thomas traces the long and controversial path of the project, ranging from the immediate aftermath of the Civil War through the Progressive era, with its mix of novelty, racism, and imperialism.

Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory by Owen J. Dwyer,Derek H. Alderman Book Summary:

"Owen Dwyer and Derek Alderman examine civil rights memorials as cultural landscapes, offering the first book-length critical reading of the monuments, museums, parts, streets, and sites dedicated to the African-American struggle for civil rights and interpreting them is the context of the Movement's broader history and its current scene. In paying close attention to which stories, people, and places are remembered and which are forgotten, the authors present an engaging account of an unforgettable story."--BOOK JACKET.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Journal of the Civil War Era by William A. Blair Book Summary:

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 3, Number 1 March 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Editor's Note William Blair Articles Amber D. Moulton Closing the "Floodgate of Impurity": Moral Reform, Antislavery, and Interracial Marriage in Antebellum Massachusetts Marc-William Palen The Civil War's Forgotten Transatlantic Tariff Debate and the Confederacy's Free Trade Diplomacy Joy M. Giguere "The Americanized Sphinx": Civil War Commemoration, Jacob Bigelow, and the Sphinx at Mount Auburn Cemetery Review Essay Enrico Dal Lago Lincoln, Cavour, and National Unification: American Republicanism and Italian Liberal Nationalism in Comparative Perspective Professional Notes James J. Broomall The Interpretation Is A-Changin': Memory, Museums, and Public History in Central Virginia Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.

Tourists of History

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Tourists of History by Marita Sturken Book Summary:

DIVStudy of how the memorials created in Oklahoma City and at the World Trade Center site raise questions about the relationship between cultural memory and consumerism./div

African American History Reconsidered

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

African American History Reconsidered by Pero Gaglo Dagbovie Book Summary:

This volume establishes new perspectives on African American history. The author discusses a wide range of issues and themes for understanding and analyzing African American history, the 20th century African American historical enterprise, and the teaching of African American history for the 21st century.

Arranging Grief

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Arranging Grief by Dana Luciano Book Summary:

2008 Winner, MLA First Book Prize Charting the proliferation of forms of mourning and memorial across a century increasingly concerned with their historical and temporal significance, Arranging Grief offers an innovative new view of the aesthetic, social, and political implications of emotion. Dana Luciano argues that the cultural plotting of grief provides a distinctive insight into the nineteenth-century American temporal imaginary, since grief both underwrote the social arrangements that supported the nation’s standard chronologies and sponsored other ways of advancing history. Nineteenth-century appeals to grief, as Luciano demonstrates, diffused modes of “sacred time” across both religious and ostensibly secular frameworks, at once authorizing and unsettling established schemes of connection to the past and the future. Examining mourning manuals, sermons, memorial tracts, poetry, and fiction by Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Apess, James Fenimore Cooper, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Susan Warner, Harriet E. Wilson, Herman Melville, Frances E. W. Harper, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Elizabeth Keckley, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, Luciano illustrates the ways that grief coupled the affective body to time. Drawing on formalist, Foucauldian, and psychoanalytic criticism, Arranging Grief shows how literary engagements with grief put forth ways of challenging deep-seated cultural assumptions about history, progress, bodies, and behaviors.

Excel HSC Modern History

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Excel HSC Modern History by Ronald E. Ringer Book Summary:

It contains: an introductory section including how to us e the book and an explanation of the new course reference to th e syllabus outcomes to ensure you cover all course requirements comprehensive coverage of the HSC core topics and the most popular Opti on topics: practice questions to test your understanding of each topic a practice HSC exam paper with comprehensive answer section a glossary of key terms and events a biography of leading historical figures a list of useful websites

Southeastern Geographer

Standing Soldiers Kneeling Slaves Race War And Monument In Nineteenth Century America [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Southeastern Geographer by David M. Cochran Jr.,Carl A. Reese Book Summary:

Table of Contents for Volume 52, Number 4 (Winter 2012) Special Issue: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Guest Editor: Chris W. Post Cover Art The Mule Pull at the Mississippi Pecan Festival Joseph S. Miller Introduction: Placing Memory and Heritage in the Geography Classroom Chris W. Post Part I: Papers ''History by the Spoonful'' in North Carolina: The Textual Politics of State Highway Historical Markers Derek H. Alderman Remembrance and Place-Making: Teaching Students to Look Ahead While Looking Back Stephen S. Birdsall Editing Memory and Automobility & Race: Two Learning Activities on Contested Heritage and Place Kenneth E. Foote A Tale of Two Civil War Statues: Teaching the Geographies of Memory and Heritage in Norfolk, Virginia Jonathan I. Leib Objectives and Prospects for Bringing Service-Learning into the Memory and Heritage Classroom Chris W. Post Making Memory, Making Landscapes: Classroom Applications of Parallel Trends in the Study of Landscape, Memory, and Learning Owen J. Dwyer and Matthew McCourt Part II: Geographical Notes A Tribute to Dr. Louis De Vorsey, Jr. (1929–2012) Sanford H. Bederman Part III: Reviews From Chicaza to Chickasaw: The European Invasion and the Transformation of the Mississippian World, 1540–1715 Robbie Ethridge Reviewed by Craig S. Revels Key Methods in Geography Nicholas Clifford, Shaun French, and Gill Valentine (Editors) Reviewed by Bandana Kar