Menu Close

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing

These are the books for those you who looking for to read the Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing, try to read or download Pdf/ePub books and some of authors may have disable the live reading. Check the book if it available for your country and user who already subscribe will have full access all free books from the library source.

Recoding Gender

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Recoding Gender by Janet Abbate Book Summary:

Today, women earn a relatively low percentage of computer science degrees and hold proportionately few technical computing jobs. Meanwhile, the stereotype of the male "computer geek" seems to be everywhere in popular culture. Few people know that women were a significant presence in the early decades of computing in both the United States and Britain. Indeed, programming in postwar years was considered woman's work (perhaps in contrast to the more manly task of building the computers themselves). In Recoding Gender, Janet Abbate explores the untold history of women in computer science and programming from the Second World War to the late twentieth century. Demonstrating how gender has shaped the culture of computing, she offers a valuable historical perspective on today's concerns over women's underrepresentation in the field. Abbate describes the experiences of women who worked with the earliest electronic digital computers: Colossus, the wartime codebreaking computer at Bletchley Park outside London, and the American ENIAC, developed to calculate ballistics. She examines postwar methods for recruiting programmers, and the 1960s redefinition of programming as the more masculine "software engineering." She describes the social and business innovations of two early software entrepreneurs, Elsie Shutt and Stephanie Shirley; and she examines the career paths of women in academic computer science. Abbate's account of the bold and creative strategies of women who loved computing work, excelled at it, and forged successful careers will provide inspiration for those working to change gendered computing culture.

Recoding Gender

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Recoding Gender by Janet Abbate Book Summary:

The untold history of women and computing: how pioneering women succeeded in a field shaped by gender biases. Today, women earn a relatively low percentage of computer science degrees and hold proportionately few technical computing jobs. Meanwhile, the stereotype of the male "computer geek" seems to be everywhere in popular culture. Few people know that women were a significant presence in the early decades of computing in both the United States and Britain. Indeed, programming in postwar years was considered woman's work (perhaps in contrast to the more manly task of building the computers themselves). In Recoding Gender, Janet Abbate explores the untold history of women in computer science and programming from the Second World War to the late twentieth century. Demonstrating how gender has shaped the culture of computing, she offers a valuable historical perspective on today's concerns over women's underrepresentation in the field. Abbate describes the experiences of women who worked with the earliest electronic digital computers: Colossus, the wartime codebreaking computer at Bletchley Park outside London, and the American ENIAC, developed to calculate ballistics. She examines postwar methods for recruiting programmers, and the 1960s redefinition of programming as the more masculine "software engineering." She describes the social and business innovations of two early software entrepreneurs, Elsie Shutt and Stephanie Shirley; and she examines the career paths of women in academic computer science. Abbate's account of the bold and creative strategies of women who loved computing work, excelled at it, and forged successful careers will provide inspiration for those working to change gendered computing culture.

Recoding Gender

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Recoding Gender by Janet Abbate Book Summary:

The untold history of women and computing: how pioneering women succeeded in a field shaped by gender biases. Today, women earn a relatively low percentage of computer science degrees and hold proportionately few technical computing jobs. Meanwhile, the stereotype of the male "computer geek" seems to be everywhere in popular culture. Few people know that women were a significant presence in the early decades of computing in both the United States and Britain. Indeed, programming in postwar years was considered woman's work (perhaps in contrast to the more manly task of building the computers themselves). In Recoding Gender, Janet Abbate explores the untold history of women in computer science and programming from the Second World War to the late twentieth century. Demonstrating how gender has shaped the culture of computing, she offers a valuable historical perspective on today's concerns over women's underrepresentation in the field. Abbate describes the experiences of women who worked with the earliest electronic digital computers: Colossus, the wartime codebreaking computer at Bletchley Park outside London, and the American ENIAC, developed to calculate ballistics. She examines postwar methods for recruiting programmers, and the 1960s redefinition of programming as the more masculine "software engineering." She describes the social and business innovations of two early software entrepreneurs, Elsie Shutt and Stephanie Shirley; and she examines the career paths of women in academic computer science. Abbate's account of the bold and creative strategies of women who loved computing work, excelled at it, and forged successful careers will provide inspiration for those working to change gendered computing culture.

Gender Codes

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Gender Codes by Thomas J. Misa Book Summary:

The computing profession faces a serious gender crisis. Today, fewer women enter computing than anytime in the past 25 years. This book provides an unprecedented look at the history of women and men in computing, detailing how the computing profession emerged and matured, and how the field became male coded. Women's experiences working in offices, education, libraries, programming, and government are examined for clues on how and where women succeeded—and where they struggled. It also provides a unique international dimension with studies examining the U.S., Great Britain, Germany, Norway, and Greece. Scholars in history, gender/women's studies, and science and technology studies, as well as department chairs and hiring directors will find this volume illuminating.

Unlocking the Clubhouse

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Unlocking the Clubhouse by Jane Margolis,Allan Fisher Book Summary:

Understanding and overcoming the gender gap in computer science education. The information technology revolution is transforming almost every aspect of society, but girls and women are largely out of the loop. Although women surf the Web in equal numbers to men and make a majority of online purchases, few are involved in the design and creation of new technology. It is mostly men whose perspectives and priorities inform the development of computing innovations and who reap the lion's share of the financial rewards. As only a small fraction of high school and college computer science students are female, the field is likely to remain a "male clubhouse," absent major changes. In Unlocking the Clubhouse, social scientist Jane Margolis and computer scientist and educator Allan Fisher examine the many influences contributing to the gender gap in computing. The book is based on interviews with more than 100 computer science students of both sexes from Carnegie Mellon University, a major center of computer science research, over a period of four years, as well as classroom observations and conversations with hundreds of college and high school faculty. The interviews capture the dynamic details of the female computing experience, from the family computer kept in a brother's bedroom to women's feelings of alienation in college computing classes. The authors investigate the familial, educational, and institutional origins of the computing gender gap. They also describe educational reforms that have made a dramatic difference at Carnegie Mellon—where the percentage of women entering the School of Computer Science rose from 7% in 1995 to 42% in 2000—and at high schools around the country.

Programmed Inequality

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Programmed Inequality by Marie Hicks Book Summary:

Introduction: Britain's computer "revolution"--War machines : women's computing work and the underpinnings of the data-driven state 1930-1946 -- Peacetime data processing : institutionalizing a feminized machine underclass 1946-1954 -- Luck and labor shortage : gender, professionalization, and opportunities for computer workers -- 1958-1969 -- The rise of the technocrat : how state attempts to centralize power through computing went -- Astray 1967-1971 -- The end of white heat and the failure of British technocracy, 1970-1979 -- Conclusion: re-assembling the history of computing to show gender's formative role -- Bibliography

Kicking Butt in Computer Science

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Kicking Butt in Computer Science by Carol Frieze,Jeria Quesenberry Book Summary:

Are women really kicking butt in computer science? National statistics show little progress in the participation of women in computing; this in spite of numerous studies, reports and recommendations on the topic. Some might say the reasons for the situation remain a mystery. However, at Carnegie Mellon University we do not believe that the situation is either so mysterious or such an intractable problem. Indeed, women are kicking butt in computer science in some cultures and environments. This book tells the Carnegie Mellon story, a positive story of how one school developed a culture and environment in which both women and men could thrive and be successful in computer science.

Women in the Labor Force

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Women in the Labor Force by N.A Book Summary:

Download or read Women in the Labor Force book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Girls Coming to Tech!

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Girls Coming to Tech! by Amy Sue Bix Book Summary:

How women coped with both formal barriers and informal opposition to their entry into the traditionally masculine field of engineering in American higher education.

Debating Same-Sex Marriage

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Debating Same-Sex Marriage by John Corvino,Maggie Gallagher Book Summary:

This volume presents both sides of the debate over whether same-sex marriage should be legalized.

Gender in Agriculture

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Gender in Agriculture by Agnes R. Quisumbing,Ruth Meinzen-Dick,Terri L. Raney,André Croppenstedt,Julia A. Behrman,Amber Peterman Book Summary:

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) produced a 2011 report on women in agriculture with a clear and urgent message: agriculture underperforms because half of all farmers—women—lack equal access to the resources and opportunities they need to be more productive. This book builds on the report’s conclusions by providing, for a non-specialist audience, a compendium of what we know now about gender gaps in agriculture.

Pioneer Programmer

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Pioneer Programmer by Jean Jennings Bartik Book Summary:

In early 1945, the United States military was recruiting female mathematicians for a top-secret project to help win World War II. Betty Jean Jennings (Bartik), a twenty-year-old college graduate from rural northwest Missouri, wanted an adventure, so she applied for the job. She was hired as a “computer” to calculate artillery shell trajectories for Aberdeen Proving Ground, and later joined a team of women who programmed the Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer (ENIAC), the first successful general-purpose programmable electronic computer. In 1947, Bartik headed up a team that modified the ENIAC into the first stored-program electronic computer. Even with her talents, Bartik met obstacles in her career due to attitudes about women’s roles in the workplace. Her perseverance paid off and she worked with the earliest computer pioneers and helped launch the commercial computer industry. Despite their contributions, Bartik and the other female ENIAC programmers have been largely ignored. In the only autobiography by any of the six original ENIAC programmers, Bartik tells her story, exposing myths about the computer’s origin and properly crediting those behind the computing innovations that shape our daily lives.

African Women and ICTs

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

African Women and ICTs by Ineke Buskens,Anne Webb Book Summary:

This book explores the ways in which women in Africa utilize Information and Communication Technologies to facilitate their empowerment; whether through the mobile village phone business, through internet use, or through new career and ICT employment opportunities. Based on the outcome of an extensive research project, this timely books features chapters based on original primary field research undertaken by academics and activists who have investigated situations within their own communities and countries. The discussion includes such issues as the notion of ICTs for empowerment and as agents of change, ICTs in the fight against gender-based violence, and how ICTs could be used to re-conceptualize public and private spaces.

The Global Gender Gap Report 2008

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Global Gender Gap Report 2008 by N.A Book Summary:

"The Index benchmarks national gender gaps on economic, political, education- and health-based criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups, over time"--P. 3.

Women and Underrepresented Minorities in Computing

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Women and Underrepresented Minorities in Computing by William Aspray Book Summary:

This text examines in detail the issue of the underrepresentation of women, African Americans, American Indians, and Hispanics in the computing disciplines in the U.S. The work reviews the underlying causes, as well as the efforts of various nonprofit organizations to correct the situation, in order to both improve social equity and address the shortage of skilled workers in this area. Topics and features: presents a digest and historical overview of the relevant literature from a range of disciplines, including leading historical and social science sources; discusses the social and political factors that have affected the demographics of the workforce from the end of WWII to the present day; provides historical case studies on organizations that have sought to broaden participation in computing and the STEM disciplines; reviews the different approaches that have been applied to address underrepresentation, at the individual, system-wide, and pathway-focused level; profiles the colleges and universities that have been successful in opening up computer science or engineering to female students; describes the impact of individual change-agents as well as whole organizations.

Invisible Women

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez Book Summary:

Data is fundamental to the modern world. From economic development, to healthcare, to education and public policy, we rely on numbers to allocate resources and make crucial decisions. But because so much data fails to take into account gender, because it treats men as the default and women as atypical, bias and discrimination are baked into our systems. And women pay tremendous costs for this bias, in time, money, and often with their lives. Celebrated feminist advocate Caroline Criado Perez investigates shocking root cause of gender inequality and research in Invisible Women†‹, diving into women’s lives at home, the workplace, the public square, the doctor’s office, and more. Built on hundreds of studies in the US, the UK, and around the world, and written with energy, wit, and sparkling intelligence, this is a groundbreaking, unforgettable exposé that will change the way you look at the world.

Advancing Women in Science

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Advancing Women in Science by Willie Pearson, Jr.,Lisa M. Frehill,Connie L. McNeely Book Summary:

Many countries have implemented policies to increase the number and quality of scientific researchers as a means to foster innovation and spur economic development and progress. To that end, grounded in a view of women as a rich, yet underutilized knowledge and labor resource, a great deal of recent attention has focused on encouraging women to pursue education and careers in science — even in countries with longstanding dominant patriarchal regimes. Yet, overall, science remains an area in which girls and women are persistently disadvantaged. This book addresses that situation. It bridges the gap between individual- and societal-level perspectives on women in science in a search for systematic solutions to the challenge of building an inclusive and productive scientific workforce capable of creating the innovation needed for economic growth and societal wellbeing. This book examines both the role of gender as an organizing principle of social life and the relative position of women scientists within national and international labor markets. Weaving together and engaging research on globalization, the social organization of science, and gendered societal relations as key social forces, this book addresses critical issues affecting women’s contributions and participation in science. Also, while considering women’s representation in science as a whole, examinations of women in the chemical sciences, computing, mathematics and statistics are offered as examples to provide insights into how differing disciplinary cultures, functional tasks and socio-historical conditions can affect the advancement of women in science relative to important variations in educational and occupational realities. Edited by three social scientists recognized for their expertise in science and technology policy, education, workforce participation, and stratification, this book includes contributions from an intellectually diverse group of international scholars and analysts and features compelling cases and initiatives from around the world, with implications for research, industry practice, education and policy development.

New Frontiers in Technological Literacy

Recoding Gender Women's Changing Participation In Computing [Pdf/ePub] eBook

New Frontiers in Technological Literacy by J. Dakers Book Summary:

This book attempts to rethink the concept of technological literacy in a modern context, not only in terms of a subject area taught in schools, but also as an important general concept that all citizens should engage with. As this book will illustrate, the concept of technological literacy has no universally agreed definition.