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Harlem Renaissance

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The Harlem Renaissance

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The Harlem Renaissance by Cheryl A. Wall Book Summary:

"This Very Short Introduction offers an overview of the Harlem Renaissance, a cultural awakening among African Americans between the two world wars. Cheryl A. Wall brings readers to the Harlem of 1920s to identify the cultural themes and issues that engaged writers, musicians, and visual artists alike"--

Was the Harlem Renaissance a Renaissance?

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Was the Harlem Renaissance a Renaissance? by Elizabeth Krajnik Book Summary:

Teach your readers the quintessential elements of a renaissance, through the details of this inspirational event. During the Harlem Renaissance, African American culture blossomed thanks in part to the Great Migration, an increase in African Americans receiving formal educations, and national organizations being created to champion African Americans' rights. Some historians argue the movement wasn't a true Renaissance, but rather represented a weakening of traditional African American culture. Regardless, this movement uplifted African American musicians, authors, actors, artists, and other individuals. Without this turning point, it is possible that African American culture might not have had an opportunity to flourish until much later. This movement reached well beyond Harlem and has influenced the modern American literary and artistic culture, and will inspire your readers in profound ways.

Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance

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Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance by Aberjhani,Sandra L. West Book Summary:

Presents articles on the period known as the Harlem Renaissance, during which African American artists, poets, writers, thinkers, and musicians flourished in Harlem, New York.

Black Women of the Harlem Renaissance Era

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Black Women of the Harlem Renaissance Era by Lean'tin L. Bracks,Jessie Carney Smith Book Summary:

The Harlem Renaissance is considered one of the most significant periods of creative and intellectual expression for African Americans. Beginning as early as 1914 and lasting into the 1940s, this era saw individuals reject the stereotypes of African Americans and confront the racist, social, political, and economic ideas that denied them citizenship and access to the American Dream. While the majority of recognized literary and artistic contributors to this period were black males, African American women were also key contributors. Black Women of the Harlem Renaissance Era profiles the most important figures of this cultural and intellectual movement. Highlighting the accomplishments of black women who sought to create positive change after the end of WWI, this reference work includes representatives not only from the literary scene but also: Activists Actresses Artists Educators Entrepreneurs Musicians Political leaders Scholars By acknowledging the women who played vital—if not always recognized—roles in this movement, this book shows how their participation helped set the stage for the continued transformation of the black community well into the 1960s. To fully realize the breadth of these contributions, editors Lean’tin L. Bracks and Jessie Carney Smith have assembled profiles written by a number of accomplished academics and historians from across the country. As such, Black Women of the Harlem Renaissance Era will be of interest to scholars of women’s studies, African American studies, and cultural history, as well as students and anyone wishing to learn more about the women of this important era.

Black Culture and the Harlem Renaissance

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Black Culture and the Harlem Renaissance by Cary D. Wintz Book Summary:

Harlem symbolized the urbanization of black America in the 1920s and 1930s. Home to the largest concentration of African Americans who settled outside the South, it spawned the literary and artistic movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. Its writers were in the vanguard of an attempt to come to terms with black urbanization. They lived it and wrote about it. First published in 1988, Black Culture and the Harlem Renaissance examines the relationship between the community and its literature. Author Cary Wintz analyzes the movement’s emergence within the framework of the black social and intellectual history of early twentieth-century America. He begins with Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, and others whose work broke barriers for the Renaissance writers to come. With an emphasis on social issues—like writers and politics, the role of black women, and the interplay between black writers and the white community—Wintz traces the rise and fall of the movement. Of special interest is material from the Knopf Collection and the papers of several Renaissance figures acquired by the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. It reveals much of interest about the relationship between the publishing world, its writers, and their patrons—both black and white.

The Harlem Renaissance

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The Harlem Renaissance by Dana Meachen Rau Book Summary:

Discusses the creation of the Harlem Renaissance, the African Americans in the spotlight there, and the legacy of future generations long after its heyday.

Harlem Renaissance Lives from the African American National Biography

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Harlem Renaissance Lives from the African American National Biography by Henry Louis Gates,Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham Book Summary:

The Harlem Renaissance is the best known and most widely studied cultural movement in African American history. Now, in Harlem Renaissance Lives, esteemed scholars Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham have selected 300 key biographical entries culled from the eight-volume African American National Biography, providing an authoritative who's who of this seminal period. Here readers will find engagingly written and authoritative articles on notable African Americans who made significant contributions to literature, drama, music, visual art, or dance, including such central figures as poet Langston Hughes, novelist Zora Neale Hurston, aviator Bessie Coleman, blues singer Ma Rainey, artist Romare Bearden, dancer Josephine Baker, jazzman Louis Armstrong, and the intellectual giant W. E. B. Du Bois. Also included are biographies of people like the Scottsboro Boys, who were not active within the movement but who nonetheless profoundly affected the artistic and political statements that came from Harlem Renaissance figures. The volume will also feature a preface by the editors, an introductory essay by historian Cary D. Wintz, and 75 illustrations.

The Harlem Renaissance: Topics

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The Harlem Renaissance: Topics by Janet Witalec Book Summary:

Presents primary sources from and criticism on the Harlem Renaissance, covering social, economic, and political influences, publishing, and the arts.

Langston Hughes

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Langston Hughes by Maurice Orlando Wallace Book Summary:

Describes the life of twentieth-century American author Langston Hughes and profiles his major poetic and prose works, also providing a chronology, bibliography, Filmography, and list of further resources.

Realism in the Novels of the Harlem Renaissance

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Realism in the Novels of the Harlem Renaissance by Ted Francis Book Summary:

The novelists of the Harlem Renaissance began writing at a point in America's literary history when the romantic tradition was being set aside for the gutsy truth-telling of realist literature. Modern criticism seems to take the flowery, nineteenth century prose found in the works of Chesnutt, Dunbar, Du Bois and others as an indication that they were writing in the romantic style. This is understandable but flawed. Almost all of the stories written during the Renaissance contained references to slavery or to Post Reconstructionist violence. For that reason few stories stemming from this period and written by African-Americans can be said to be "romantic."

The Harlem Renaissance: An Interactive History Adventure

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The Harlem Renaissance: An Interactive History Adventure by Allison Lassieur Book Summary:

Download or read The Harlem Renaissance: An Interactive History Adventure book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance

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Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance by Houston A. Baker, Jr. Book Summary:

"Mr. Baker perceives the harlem Renaissance as a crucial moment in a movement, predating the 1920's, when Afro-Americans embraced the task of self-determination and in so doing gave forth a distinctive form of expression that still echoes in a broad spectrum of 20th-century Afro-American arts. . . . Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance may well become Afro-America's 'studying manual.'"—Tonya Bolden, New York Times Book Review

Harlem Renaissance

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Harlem Renaissance by the late Nathan Irvin Huggins Book Summary:

A finalist for the 1972 National Book Award, hailed by The New York Times Book Review as "brilliant" and "provocative," Nathan Huggins' Harlem Renaissance was a milestone in the study of African-American life and culture. Now this classic history is being reissued, with a new foreword by acclaimed biographer Arnold Rampersad. As Rampersad notes, "Harlem Renaissance remains an indispensable guide to the facts and features, the puzzles and mysteries, of one of the most provocative episodes in African-American and American history." Indeed, Huggins offers a brilliant account of the creative explosion in Harlem during these pivotal years. Blending the fields of history, literature, music, psychology, and folklore, he illuminates the thought and writing of such key figures as Alain Locke, James Weldon Johnson, and W.E.B. DuBois and provides sharp-eyed analyses of the poetry of Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, and Langston Hughes. But the main objective for Huggins, throughout the book, is always to achieve a better understanding of America as a whole. As Huggins himself noted, he didn't want Harlem in the 1920s to be the focus of the book so much as a lens through which readers might see how this one moment in time sheds light on the American character and culture, not just in Harlem but across the nation. He strives throughout to link the work of poets and novelists not only to artists working in other genres and media but also to economic, historical, and cultural forces in the culture at large. This superb reissue of Harlem Renaissance brings to a new generation of readers one of the great works in African-American history and indeed a landmark work in the field of American Studies.

The Harlem Renaissance

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The Harlem Renaissance by Harold Bloom Book Summary:

Harlem in the 1920s and '30s was the epicenter of a flourishing in African-American literature with the poetry and prose of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Claude McKay, to name a few. This volume examines the defining themes and styles of African-American literature during this period, which laid the groundwork for contemporary African-American writers.

Gay Voices of the Harlem Renaissance

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Gay Voices of the Harlem Renaissance by A. B. Christa Schwarz Book Summary:

"Heretofore scholars have not been willing—perhaps, even been unable for many reasons both academic and personal—to identify much of the Harlem Renaissance work as same-sex oriented.... An important book." —Jim Elledge This groundbreaking study explores the Harlem Renaissance as a literary phenomenon fundamentally shaped by same-sex-interested men. Christa Schwarz focuses on Countée Cullen, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Richard Bruce Nugent and explores these writers' sexually dissident or gay literary voices. The portrayals of men-loving men in these writers' works vary significantly. Schwarz locates in the poetry of Cullen, Hughes, and McKay the employment of contemporary gay code words, deriving from the Greek discourse of homosexuality and from Walt Whitman. By contrast, Nugent—the only "out" gay Harlem Renaissance artist—portrayed men-loving men without reference to racial concepts or Whitmanesque codes. Schwarz argues for contemporary readings attuned to the complex relation between race, gender, and sexual orientation in Harlem Renaissance writing.

Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance: A-J

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Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance: A-J by Cary D. Wintz,Paul Finkelman Book Summary:

An interdisciplinary look at the Harlem Renaissance, it includes essays on the principal participants, those who defined the political, intellectual and cultural milieu in which the Renaissance existed; on important events and places.

The Harlem Renaissance

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The Harlem Renaissance by Steven Watson Book Summary:

A beautifully illustrated history of the Harlem Renaissance profiles the distinguished writers--Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, and others--at the center of the African-American literary movement, set against the backdrop of Harlem in its heyday.

Teaching the Harlem Renaissance

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Teaching the Harlem Renaissance by Michael Soto Book Summary:

Teaching the Harlem Renaissance: Course Design and Classroom Strategies addresses the practical and theoretical needs of college and high school instructors offering a unit or a full course on the Harlem Renaissance. In this collection many of the field's leading scholars address a wide range of issues and primary materials: the role of slave narrative in shaping individual and collective identity; the long-recognized centrality of women writers, editors, and critics within the «New Negro» movement; the role of the visual arts and «popular» forms in the dialogue about race and cultural expression; and tried-and-true methods for bringing students into contact with the movement's poetry, prose, and visual art. Teaching the Harlem Renaissance is meant to be an ongoing resource for scholars and teachers as they devise a syllabus, prepare a lecture or lesson plan, or simply learn more about a particular Harlem Renaissance writer or text.