Menu Close

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire

These are the books for those you who looking for to read the Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire, try to read or download Pdf/ePub books and some of authors may have disable the live reading. Check the book if it available for your country and user who already subscribe will have full access all free books from the library source.

Cosmopolis

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Cosmopolis by Daniel S. Richter Book Summary:

"This is an outstanding synthesis of dazzling intellectual range and temporal sweep that teems with original apercus. Tracing the development of ancient ideas about the community of mankind, Richter shows how Greekness evolved from an ethnic and regional category in self-conscious opposition to 'barbarian' into a potentially universal form of cultural identity that even ethnic 'barbarians' might claim" -- Maud W. Gleason, Stanford University.

The Hellenistic Reception of Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Hellenistic Reception of Classical Athenian Democracy and Political Thought by Mirko Canevaro,Benjamin Gray Book Summary:

In the Hellenistic period (c.323-31 BCE), Greek teachers, philosophers, historians, orators, and politicians found an essential point of reference in the democracy of Classical Athens and the political thought which it produced. However, while Athenian civic life and thought in the Classical period have been intensively studied, these aspects of the Hellenistic period have so far received much less attention. This volume seeks to bring together the two areas of research, shedding new light on these complementary parts of the history of the ancient Greek polis. The essays collected here encompass historical, philosophical, and literary approaches to the various Hellenistic responses to and adaptations of Classical Athenian politics. They survey the complex processes through which Athenian democratic ideals of equality, freedom, and civic virtue were emphasized, challenged, blunted, or reshaped in different Hellenistic contexts and genres. They also consider the reception, in the changed political circumstances, of Classical Athenian non- and anti-democratic political thought. This makes it possible to investigate how competing Classical Athenian ideas about the value or shortcomings of democracy and civic community continued to echo through new political debates in Hellenistic cities and schools. Looking ahead to the Roman Imperial period, the volume also explores to what extent those who idealized Classical Athens as a symbol of cultural and intellectual excellence drew on, or forgot, its legacy of democracy and vigorous political debate. By addressing these different questions it not only tracks changes in practices and conceptions of politics and the city in the Hellenistic world, but also examines developing approaches to culture, rhetoric, history, ethics, and philosophy, and especially their relationships with politics.

Rome, Global Dreams, and the International Origins of an Empire

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Rome, Global Dreams, and the International Origins of an Empire by Sarah Davies Book Summary:

In Rome, Global Dreams, and the International Origins of an Empire, Sarah Davies explores how the Roman Republic evolved, in ideological terms, into an “Empire without end.” This work stands out within imperialism studies by placing an emphasis on the role of international-level norms in shaping Roman imperium.

Syrian Identity in the Greco-Roman World

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Syrian Identity in the Greco-Roman World by Nathanael J. Andrade Book Summary:

By engaging with recent developments in the study of empires, this book examines how inhabitants of Roman imperial Syria reinvented expressions and experiences of Greek, Roman and Syrian identification. It demonstrates how the organization of Greek communities and a peer polity network extending citizenship to ethnic Syrians generated new semiotic frameworks for the performance of Greekness and Syrianness. Within these, Syria's inhabitants reoriented and interwove idioms of diverse cultural origins, including those from the Near East, to express Greek, Roman and Syrian identifications in innovative and complex ways. While exploring a vast array of written and material sources, the book thus posits that Greekness and Syrianness were constantly shifting and transforming categories, and it critiques many assumptions that govern how scholars of antiquity often conceive of Roman imperial Greek identity, ethnicity and culture in the Roman Near East, and processes of 'hybridity' or similar concepts.

Urban Dreams and Realities in Antiquity

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Urban Dreams and Realities in Antiquity by N.A Book Summary:

Urban Dreams and Realities is a collection of articles on cities in ancient cultures, both their physical and conceptual aspects. A wide range of subjects and disciplinary perspectives are represented, especially the archaeology, epigraphy and literature of the Roman Empire.

Bollettino di studi latini

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Bollettino di studi latini by N.A Book Summary:

Download or read Bollettino di studi latini book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

The Oxford Handbook to the Second Sophistic

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Oxford Handbook to the Second Sophistic by William A. Johnson,Daniel S. Richter Book Summary:

Focusing on the period known as the Second Sophistic (an era roughly co-extensive with the second century AD), this Handbook serves the need for a broad and accessible overview. The study of the Second Sophistic is a relative new-comer to the Anglophone field of classics and much of what characterizes it temporally and culturally remains a matter of legitimate contestation. The present handbook offers a diversity of scholarly voices that attempt to define, as much as is possible in a single volume, the state of this rapidly developing field. Included are chapters that offer practical guidance on the wide range of valuable textual materials that survive, many of which are useful or even core to inquiries of particularly current interest (e.g. gender studies, cultural history of the body, sociology of literary culture, history of education and intellectualism, history of religion, political theory, history of medicine, cultural linguistics, intersection of the Classical traditions and early Christianity). The Handbook also contains essays devoted to the work of the most significant intellectuals of the period such as Plutarch, Dio Chrysostom, Lucian, Apuleius, the novelists, the Philostrati and Aelius Aristides. In addition to content and bibliographical guidance, however, this volume is designed to help to situate the textual remains within the period and its society, to describe and circumscribe not simply the literary matter but the literary culture and societal context. For that reason, the Handbook devotes considerable space at the front to various contextual essays, and throughout tries to keep the contextual demands in mind. In its scope and in its pluralism of voices this Handbook thus represents a new approach to the Second Sophistic, one that attempts to integrate Greek literature of the Roman period into the wider world of early imperial Greek, Latin, Jewish, and Christian cultural production, and one that keeps a sharp focus on situating these texts within their socio-cultural context.

Rome and its Empire, AD 193-284

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Rome and its Empire, AD 193-284 by Olivier Hekster Book Summary:

This was a time of civil war, anarchy, intrigue, and assassination.Between 193 and 284 the Roman Empire knew more than twenty-five emperors, and an equal number of usurpers. All of them had some measure of success, several of them often ruling different parts of the Empire at the same time. Rome's traditional political institutions slid into vacuity and armies became the Empire's most powerful institutions, proclaiming their own imperial champions and deposing those they held to be incompetent.Yet despite widespread contemporary dismay at such weak government this period was also one in which the boundaries of the Empire remained fairly stable; the rights and privileges of Roman citizenship were extended equally to all free citizens of the Empire; in several regions the economy remained robust in the face of rampant inflation; and literary culture, philosophy, and legal theory flourished. Historians have been discussing how and why this could have been for centuries. Olivier Hekster takes you to th

Globalisation and the Roman World

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Globalisation and the Roman World by Martin Pitts Book Summary:

This book applies modern theories of globalisation to the ancient Roman world, creating new understandings of Roman archaeology and history. This is the first book to intensely scrutinize the subject through a team of international specialists studying a wide range of topics, including imperialism, economics, migration, urbanism and art.

The Roman Empire

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Roman Empire by Neville Morley Book Summary:

Over a millennium after the end of its unrivalled dominance, the spectre of Rome figures highly in western culture. This book explores what the empire meant to its subjects.The idea of Rome has long outlived the physical empire that gave it form, and now holds sway over vastly more people and a far greater geographical area than the Romans ever ruled. It continues to shape our understanding of the nature of imperialism and influence the workings of the world. It is through the lens of Rome that we answer questions such as: How do empires grow? How are empires ruled? Do empires exploit their subjects or civilise them? Rejecting the simplistic narrative of military triumph followed by decline and fall, the books analyses the origins of Roman imperialism, its wide-ranging impact on the regions it conquered, and its continuing influence in debates about modern imperialism.

Nationalism and Ethnosymbolism: History, Culture and Ethnicity in the Formation of Nations

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Nationalism and Ethnosymbolism: History, Culture and Ethnicity in the Formation of Nations by Athena Leoussi Book Summary:

Ethnosymbolism offers a distinct and innovative approach to the study of nations and nationalism. It focuses on the role of ethnic myths, historical memories, symbols and traditions in the creation and maintenance of the collective identity of modern nations. This book explores the different aspects of the ethnosymbolic approach to the study of ethnicity, nationality and nationalism.Nationalism and Ethnosymbolism first introduces the main theoretical considerations that have arisen in nationalism studies in the past two decades. It then presents a collection of case studies covering music and poetry, ethnosymbolism in antiquity, and a wide variety of nations and regions. Areas discussed include Eastern Europe and Russia, the Middle East, the Far East and India, Africa, and the Americas.Overall the book offers a defence of the methodology of ethnosymbolism and a demonstration of its explanatory power.

Empire and Communications

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Empire and Communications by Harold A. Innis Book Summary:

"Empire and Communications" is one of Innis's most important contributions to the debate about how media influences the development of consciousness and societies.-This is one of Innis's most important contributions to the debate about how media influences the development of consciousness and societies.

History of Mehmed the Conqueror

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

History of Mehmed the Conqueror by Kritovoulos Book Summary:

Five hundred years ago the great walled city of Constantinople fell under the relentless siege of the Ottoman Turks led by Sultan Mehmed II, Mehmed the Conqueror. Kristovoulos, one of the vanquished Greeks, later entered into the service of the Conqueror and began to write a history of the Sultan's life, starting with the year 1451, the beginning of Mehmed's 31-year reign. Death apparently prevented Kritovoulos from completing his account, but the manuscript covering the first seventeen years has been preserved and this exciting chronicle is here translated into English for the first time. Charles T. Riggs, who died in February 1953 at Robert College in modern Istanbul, was a missionary in the Near East. Originally published in 1954. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The State of Speech

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The State of Speech by Joy Connolly Book Summary:

Rhetorical theory, the core of Roman education, taught rules of public speaking that are still influential today. But Roman rhetoric has long been regarded as having little important to say about political ideas. The State of Speech presents a forceful challenge to this view. The first book to read Roman rhetorical writing as a mode of political thought, it focuses on Rome's greatest practitioner and theorist of public speech, Cicero. Through new readings of his dialogues and treatises, Joy Connolly shows how Cicero's treatment of the Greek rhetorical tradition's central questions is shaped by his ideal of the republic and the citizen. Rhetoric, Connolly argues, sheds new light on Cicero's deepest political preoccupations: the formation of individual and communal identity, the communicative role of the body, and the "unmanly" aspects of politics, especially civility and compromise. Transcending traditional lines between rhetorical and political theory, The State of Speech is a major contribution to the current debate over the role of public speech in Roman politics. Instead of a conventional, top-down model of power, it sketches a dynamic model of authority and consent enacted through oratorical performance and examines how oratory modeled an ethics of citizenship for the masses as well as the elite. It explains how imperial Roman rhetoricians reshaped Cicero's ideal republican citizen to meet the new political conditions of autocracy, and defends Ciceronian thought as a resource for contemporary democracy.

Italian Hours

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Italian Hours by Henry James Book Summary:

Part of a remarkably talented family, Henry James is regarded as one of the most important American writers of the nineteenth century. Although he is best known for novels such as The Wings of the Dove and The Portrait of a Lady, James was also a renowned essayist. This volume collects a series of essays about James' extensive travels in Italy, which were written and revised by the author over a period of 40 years.

Transformations of Romanness

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Transformations of Romanness by Walter Pohl,Clemens Gantner,Cinzia Grifoni,Marianne Pollheimer-Mohaupt Book Summary:

Roman identity is one of the most interesting cases of social identity because in the course of time, it could mean so many different things: for instance, Greek-speaking subjects of the Byzantine empire, inhabitants of the city of Rome, autonomous civic or regional groups, Latin speakers under ‘barbarian’ rule in the West or, increasingly, representatives of the Church of Rome. Eventually, the Christian dimension of Roman identity gained ground. The shifting concepts of Romanness represent a methodological challenge for studies of ethnicity because, depending on its uses, Roman identity may be regarded as ‘ethnic’ in a broad sense, but under most criteria, it is not. Romanness is indeed a test case how an established and prestigious social identity can acquire many different shades of meaning, which we would class as civic, political, imperial, ethnic, cultural, legal, religious, regional or as status groups. This book offers comprehensive overviews of the meaning of Romanness in most (former) Roman provinces, complemented by a number of comparative and thematic studies. A similarly wide-ranging overview has not been available so far.

The Ottoman Age of Exploration

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Ottoman Age of Exploration by Giancarlo Casale Book Summary:

In 1517, the Ottoman Sultan Selim "the Grim" conquered Egypt and brought his empire for the first time in history into direct contact with the trading world of the Indian Ocean. During the decades that followed, the Ottomans became progressively more engaged in the affairs of this vast and previously unfamiliar region, eventually to the point of launching a systematic ideological, military and commercial challenge to the Portuguese Empire, their main rival for control of the lucrative trade routes of maritime Asia. The Ottoman Age of Exploration is the first comprehensive historical account of this century-long struggle for global dominance, a struggle that raged from the shores of the Mediterranean to the Straits of Malacca, and from the interior of Africa to the steppes of Central Asia. Based on extensive research in the archives of Turkey and Portugal, as well as materials written on three continents and in a half dozen languages, it presents an unprecedented picture of the global reach of the Ottoman state during the sixteenth century. It does so through a dramatic recounting of the lives of sultans and viziers, spies, corsairs, soldiers-of-fortune, and women from the imperial harem. Challenging traditional narratives of Western dominance, it argues that the Ottomans were not only active participants in the Age of Exploration, but ultimately bested the Portuguese in the game of global politics by using sea power, dynastic prestige, and commercial savoir faire to create their own imperial dominion throughout the Indian Ocean.

India and the Hellenistic World

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

India and the Hellenistic World by Klaus Karttunen Book Summary:

Download or read India and the Hellenistic World book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Why This New Race

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Why This New Race by Denise Kimber Buell Book Summary:

Denise Kimber Buell radically rethinks the origins of Christian identity, arguing that race and ethnicity played a central role in early Christian theology. Focusing on texts written before the legalization of Christianity in 313 C.E., including Greek apologetic treatises, martyr narratives, and works by Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Justin Martyr, and Tertullian, Buell shows how philosophers and theologians defined Christians as a distinct group within the Roman world, characterizing Christianness as something both fixed in its essence and fluid in its acquisition through conversion. Buell demonstrates how this view allowed Christians to establish boundaries around the meaning of Christianness and to develop the kind of universalizing claims aimed at uniting all members of the faith. Her arguments challenge generations of scholars who have refused to acknowledge ethnic reasoning in early Christian discourses. They also provide crucial insight into the historical legacy of Christian anti-Semitism and contemporary issues of race.

Cosmopolis

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Cosmopolis by Stephen Edelston Toulmin,Stephen Toulmin Book Summary:

In the seventeenth century, a vision arose which was to captivate the Western imagination for the next three hundred years: the vision of Cosmopolis, a society as rationally ordered as the Newtonian view of nature. While fueling extraordinary advances in all fields of human endeavor, this vision perpetuated a hidden yet persistent agenda: the delusion that human nature and society could be fitted into precise and manageable rational categories. Stephen Toulmin confronts that agenda—its illusions and its consequences for our present and future world. "By showing how different the last three centuries would have been if Montaigne, rather than Descartes, had been taken as a starting point, Toulmin helps destroy the illusion that the Cartesian quest for certainty is intrinsic to the nature of science or philosophy."—Richard M. Rorty, University of Virginia "[Toulmin] has now tackled perhaps his most ambitious theme of all. . . . His aim is nothing less than to lay before us an account of both the origins and the prospects of our distinctively modern world. By charting the evolution of modernity, he hopes to show us what intellectual posture we ought to adopt as we confront the coming millennium."—Quentin Skinner, New York Review of Books

The Idea of Progress

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Idea of Progress by J. B. Bury Book Summary:

"We may believe in the doctrine of Progress or we may not, but in either case it is a matter of interest to examine the origins and trace the history of what is now, even should it ultimately prove to be no more than an idolum saeculi, the animating and controlling idea of western civilisation. For the earthly Progress of humanity is the general test to which social aims and theories are submitted as a matter of course. The phrase CIVILISATION AND PROGRESS has become stereotyped, and illustrates how we have come to judge a civilisation good or bad according as it is or is not progressive. The ideals of liberty and democracy, which have their own ancient and independent justifications, have sought a new strength by attaching themselves to Progress. The conjunctions of "liberty and progress," "democracy and progress," meet us at every turn. Socialism, at an early stage of its modern development, sought the same aid. The friends of Mars, who cannot bear the prospect of perpetual peace, maintain that war is an indispensable instrument of Progress. It is in the name of Progress that the doctrinaires who established the present reign of terror in Russia profess to act. All this shows the prevalent feeling that a social or political theory or programme is hardly tenable if it cannot claim that it harmonises with this controlling idea."

Spaces of Identity

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Spaces of Identity by David Morley,Kevin Robins Book Summary:

We are living through a time when old identities - nation, culture and gender are melting down. Spaces of Identity examines the ways in which collective cultural identities are being reshaped under conditions of a post-modern geography and a communications environment of cable and satellite broadcasting. To address current problems of identity, the authors look at contemporary politics between Europe and its most significant others: America; Islam and the Orient. They show that it's against these places that Europe's own identity has been and is now being defined. A stimulating account of the complex and contradictory nature of contemporary cultural identities.

A History of Western Political Thought

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

A History of Western Political Thought by J. S. McClelland,Dr J S Mcclelland Book Summary:

A History of Western Political Thought is an energetic and lucid account of the most important political thinkers and the enduring themes of the last two and a half millennia. Written with students of the history of political thought in mind, the book: * traces the development of political thought from Ancient Greece to the late twentieth century * focuses on individual thinkers and texts * includes 40 biographies of key political thinkers * offers original views of theorists and highlights those which may have been unjustly neglected * develops the wider themes of political thought and the relations between thinkers over time.

Hamlet's Ghost

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Hamlet's Ghost by James Cowan Book Summary:

Occasionally a man emerges from history without us knowing him. Duke Vespasiano Gonzaga (1531–91) of Sabbioneta escaped the net of sixteenth century Italy, its history of wars and conflicts, to fashion a life that was uniquely different. He set out to change the way urban man lived. Importantly, he was the first man to build a Città ideale. Sabbioneta is the prototype of all planned cities of the modern era. As a confidant of King Philip II of Spain and a traveller, he quickly acquired a cosmopolitan worldview, which led him to become a uomo universale. It was in this capacity that he designed Sabbioneta as a genuine “little Athens.” His life was fraught with tragedy, however. Not only did he suffer from syphilis, but his personal troubles left him emotionally damaged. The mysterious death of two wives, including the beautiful Diana of Cardona, forced him to find solace in the construction of his ideal city. As nephew to the legendary Giulia Gonzaga – and with her encouragement – the Duke managed to forge a career as a poet, bibliophile, antiquarian, condottiero, urban planner and diplomat, all against the backdrop of New World discovery, the Protestant Reformation, and the Inquisition. This book reveals another fascinating story: Vespasiano Gonzaga’s link to Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Like the Prince of Denmark, he reflects the emergence of our modern consciousness. He was a true Renaissance man whose legacy remains with us to this day. As a self-fashioned personality, the Duke made every attempt to place himself at the forefront of events of his time. His life tells us a great deal about how late-Renaissance men exteriorised their inner world in a bid to achieve immortality.

Roman Imperial Identities in the Early Christian Era

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Roman Imperial Identities in the Early Christian Era by Judith Perkins Book Summary:

Through the close study of texts, Roman Imperial Identities in the Early Christian Era examines the overlapping emphases and themes of two cosmopolitan and multiethnic cultural identities emerging in the early centuries CE – a trans-empire alliance of the Elite and the "Christians." Exploring the cultural representations of these social identities, Judith Perkins shows that they converge around an array of shared themes: violence, the body, prisons, courts, and time. Locating Christian representations within their historical context and in dialogue with other contemporary representations, it asks why do Christian representations share certain emphases? To what do they respond, and to whom might they appeal? For example, does the increasing Christian emphasis on a fully material human resurrection in the early centuries, respond to the evolution of a harsher and more status based judicial system? Judith Perkins argues that Christians were so successful in suppressing their social identity as inhabitants of the Roman Empire, that historical documents and testimony have been sequestered as "Christian" rather than recognized as evidence for the social dynamics enacted during the period, Her discussion offers a stimulating survey of interest to students of ancient narrative, cultural studies and gender.

Universal Empire

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Universal Empire by Peter Fibiger Bang,Dariusz Kolodziejczyk Book Summary:

The claim by certain rulers to universal empire has a long history stretching as far back as the Assyrian and Achaemenid Empires. This book traces its various manifestations in classical antiquity, the Islamic world, Asia and Central America as well as considering seventeenth- and eighteenth-century European discussions of international order. As such it is an exercise in comparative world history combining a multiplicity of approaches, from ancient history, to literary and philosophical studies, to the history of art and international relations and historical sociology. The notion of universal, imperial rule is presented as an elusive and much coveted prize among monarchs in history, around which developed forms of kingship and political culture. Different facets of the phenomenon are explored under three, broadly conceived, headings: symbolism, ceremony and diplomatic relations; universal or cosmopolitan literary high-cultures; and, finally, the inclination to present universal imperial rule as an expression of cosmic order.

Cosmopolitanism: Educational, Philosophical and Historical Perspectives

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Cosmopolitanism: Educational, Philosophical and Historical Perspectives by Marianna Papastephanou Book Summary:

This volume discusses perspectives on cosmopolitanism, as well as concepts and the work of key figures. For example, it examines educational, philosophical and historical perspectives, deals with such issues as citizenship, internationalism, patriotism, globalization, hegemony and many other topics. It brings together works on Alain Badiou, Giorgio Agamben, Ernesto Laclau, Bruno Latour and Homi Bhabha with works on Whitman, Kant, Martha Nussbaum, Thomas Pogge, Onora O’Neill and Philippe Van Parijs. The book engages in the new dialogue on cosmopolitanism from a variety of outlooks. It advances that dialogue and problematizes it through as yet unexplored paths. Its chapters respond to the intricacies of current discourses on cosmopolitanism and related notions and take into account both affirmative and negative stances to cosmopolitanism and its educational significance. Overall, the book relies on such stances as background material in order to transcend them and offer fresh perspectives on cosmopolitan stakes. It makes use of a recent tendency in political philosophical and cultural-critical debates that opens a possibility of more nuanced approaches to old ‘-isms’.

The Idea of Kosmopolis

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Idea of Kosmopolis by Rebecka Lettevall,My Klockar Linder Book Summary:

"Contemporary discussions on cosmopolitanism are often based on older assumptions that have become invisible or hard to unearth. This volume explores the idea of kosmopolis by placing it into different historical, philosophical, social, and political contexts. By bringing together different views on and aspects of cosmopolitanism, the volume aims at contributing to new understandings of kosmopolis and the resulting cosmopolitan ideal, and of the fears this concept may generate. The nine contributors discuss kosmopolis within the contexts of philosophers such as Heraclitus and Kant, the thoughts and texts of the nobility, intellectual thoughts from the Enlightenment, contemporary political institutions, and grass root cosmopolitanism. The intent is to illustrate how the meaning of - cosmopolitanism - is influenced not only by its history but also by its specific contexts."--Back cover.

1896: The First Modern Olympics

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

1896: The First Modern Olympics by N.A Book Summary:

Download or read 1896: The First Modern Olympics book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

In the Shadow of the Sword

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

In the Shadow of the Sword by Tom Holland Book Summary:

A panoramic chronicle of the rise of Islam by the author of Rubicon traces the rapid evolution of Arabian culture over a period of formative decades during which it triumphed against formidable odds and the period's most powerful empire. 25,000 first printing.

Post-Hellenistic Philosophy

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Post-Hellenistic Philosophy by George Boys-Stones Book Summary:

This book traces, for the first time, a revolution in philosophy which took place during the early centuries of our era. It reconstructs the philosophical basis of the Stoics' theory that fragments of an ancient and divine wisdom could be reconstructed from mythological traditions, and shows that Platonism was founded on an argument that Plato had himself achieved a full reconstruction of this wisdom, and that subsequent philosophies had only regressed once again in their attempts to 'improve' on his achievement. The significance of this development is highlighted through parallel studies of the Hellenistic debate over the status of Jewish culture; and of the philosophical beginnings of Christianity, where the notions of 'orthodoxy' and 'heresy' in particular are shown to be tools in the construction of a unified history of Christian philosophy stretching back to primitive antiquity.

The Second Sophistic

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Second Sophistic by Graham Anderson Book Summary:

Sophism was the single most important movement in second century literature: prose of that period came to be written as entertainment rather than confined to historical subjects. Graham Anderson shows how the Greek sophists' skills in public speaking enabled them to perform effectively across a variety of activities. As he presents the sophists' roles as civic celebrities side-by-side with their roles as transmitters of Hellenic culture and literary artists, a co-ordinated view of the Second Sophistic as a complex phenomenon emerges.

The Histories of Polybius

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Histories of Polybius by Polybius Book Summary:

This 1889 first full English translation of Polybius' Histories remains a fascinating source on the second and third centuries BCE.

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Attila

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Attila by Michael Maas Book Summary:

This book considers the great cultural and geopolitical changes in western Eurasia in the fifth century CE. It focuses on the Roman Empire, but it also examines the changes taking place in northern Europe, in Iran under the Sasanian Empire, and on the great Eurasian steppe. Attila is presented as a contributor to and a symbol of these transformations.

Governance Of Science

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Governance Of Science by Fuller, Steve Book Summary:

This ground-breaking text offers a fresh perspective on the governance of science from the standpoint of social and political theory. Science has often been seen as the only institution that embodies the elusive democratic ideal of the 'open society'. Yet, science remains an elite activity that commands much more public trust than understanding, even though science has become increasingly entangled with larger political and economic issues.

The Stoic Idea of the City

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Stoic Idea of the City by Malcolm Schofield Book Summary:

This systematic analysis of the Stoic school concentrates on Zeno's Republic. Using textual evidence, the author examines the Stoic ideals that initiated the natural law tradition of western political thought.

The Rise of Democracy

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Rise of Democracy by Christopher Hobson Book Summary:

Little over 200 years ago, a quarter of a century of warfare with an 'outlaw state' brought the great powers of Europe to their knees. That state was the revolutionary democracy of France. Since then, there has been a remarkable transformation in the way democracy is understood and valued - today, it is the non-democractic states that are seen as rogue regimes. Now, Christopher Hobson explores democracy's remarkable rise from obscurity to centre stage in contemporary international relations.

The Darker Side of Western Modernity

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

The Darker Side of Western Modernity by Walter Mignolo Book Summary:

DIVA new and more concrete understanding of the inseparability of colonialism and modernity that also explores how the rhetoric of modernity disguises the logic of coloniality and how this rhetoric has been instrumental in establishing capitalism as the econ/div

Religions of Rome: Volume 2, A Sourcebook

Cosmopolis Imagining Community In Late Classical Athens And The Early Roman Empire [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Religions of Rome: Volume 2, A Sourcebook by Mary Beard,John North,Simon Price Book Summary:

Volume two reveals the extraordinary diversity of ancient Roman religion. A comprehensive sourcebook, it presents a wide range of documents illustrating religious life in the Roman world - from the foundations of the city in the eighth century BC to the Christian capital more than a thousand years later. Each document is given a full introduction, explanatory notes and bibliography, and acts as a starting point for further discussion. Through paintings, sculptures, coins and inscriptions, as well as literary texts in translation, the book explores the major themes and problems of Roman religion, such as sacrifice, the religious calendar, divination, ritual, and priesthood. Starting from the archaeological traces of the earliest cults of the city, it finishes with a series of texts in which Roman authors themselves reflect on the nature of their own religion, its history, even its funny side. Judaism and Christianity are given full coverage, as important elements in the religious world of the Roman empire.