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A Hubert Harrison Reader

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Hubert Harrison

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Hubert Harrison by Jeffrey Babcock Perry Book Summary:

Follows the life of Hubert H. Harrison, the founder of the "New Negro" movement and political figure in the Harlem Renaissance.

Hubert Harrison

A Hubert Harrison Reader [Pdf/ePub] eBook

Hubert Harrison by Jeffrey B. Perry Book Summary:

Hubert Harrison (1883-1927) was a brilliant writer, orator, educator, critic, and activist who combined class consciousness and anti-white-supremacist race consciousness into a potent political radicalism. In this second volume of his acclaimed biography, Jeffrey B. Perry traces the final decade of Harrison's life, from 1918 to 1927.

Radical Sensations

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Radical Sensations by Shelley Streeby Book Summary:

The significant anarchist, black, and socialist world-movements that emerged in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth adapted discourses of sentiment and sensation and used the era's new forms of visual culture to move people to participate in projects of social, political, and economic transformation. Drawing attention to the vast archive of images and texts created by radicals prior to the 1930s, Shelley Streeby analyses representations of violence and of abuses of state power in response to the Haymarket police riot, of the trial and execution of the Chicago anarchists, and of the mistreatment and imprisonment of Ricardo and Enrique Flores Magón and other members of the Partido Liberal Mexicano. She considers radicals' reactions to and depictions of U.S. imperialism, state violence against the Yaqui Indians in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, the failure of the United States to enact laws against lynching, and the harsh repression of radicals that accelerated after the United States entered the First World War. By focusing on the adaptation and critique of sentiment, sensation, and visual culture by radical world-movements in the period between the Haymarket riots of 1886 and the deportation of Marcus Garvey in 1927, Streeby sheds new light on the ways that these movements reached across national boundaries, criticized state power, and envisioned alternative worlds.

When Africa Awakes

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When Africa Awakes by Hubert H. Harrison Book Summary:

Download or read When Africa Awakes book by clicking button below to visit the book download website. There are multiple format available for you to choose (Pdf, ePub, Doc).

Black Radical Tradition

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Black Radical Tradition by Erin Grey,Asad Haider,Ben Mabie Book Summary:

An exhaustive collection of black revolutionary theory from slavery and reconstruction to Black Power to Black Feminism With activists taking to the streets with renewed vigor to fight racism, inequality, and capitalism, this collection of classic writing and primary documents restores the historical grounding and revolutionary genealogy of today's protest movements. Including key writings of thinkers and figures like W.E.B. Du Bois, Hubert Harrison, Harry Haywood, Claude McKay, Claudia Jones, C.L.R. James, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde and the Combahee River Collective, this is the most comprehensive gathering of revolutionary black voices ever assembled. And in highlighting the central debates that animated the movement through its long history, it registers the monumental import that black radical theory brings to our understanding of the past and present alike. Incisive contextual materials from the editors help situate each contribution in its historical and political setting, and a forward from Barbara Ransby argues for the resounding purchase these authors have for our own time. The book is a powerful testament to over 150 years of struggle, a valuable resource for both scholars and activists.

Reframing Randolph

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Reframing Randolph by Andrew E. Kersten,Clarence Lang Book Summary:

"Foreword / Arlene Holt Baker -- A reintroduction to Asa Philip Randolph / Andrew E. Kersten and Clarence Lang -- Researching Randolph: Shifting historiographic perspectives / Joe William Trotter, Jr. -- A. Philip Randolph: emerging socialist radical / Eric Arnesen -- Keeping his faith: A. Philip Randolph's working-class religion / Cynthia Taylor -- Brotherhood men and singing Slackers: A. Philip Randolph's rhetoric of music and manhood / Robert Hawkins -- The spirit and strategy of the United Front: Randolph and the National Negro Congress, 1936-1940 / Erik S. Gellman -- Organizing gender: A. Philip Randolph and women activists / Melinda Chateauvert -- Beyond A. Philip Randolph: Grassroots protest and the March on Washington Movement / David Lucander -- The "Void at the Center of the Story": The Negro American Labor Council and the long civil rights movement / William P. Jones -- No exit: A. Philip Randolph and the Ocean Hill-Brownsville Crisis / Jerald Podair.

Transpacific Antiracism

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Transpacific Antiracism by Yuichiro Onishi Book Summary:

Transpacific Antiracism introduces the dynamic process out of which social movements in Black America, Japan, and Okinawa formed Afro-Asian solidarities against the practice of white supremacy in the twentieth century. Yuichiro Onishi argues that in the context of forging Afro-Asian solidarities, race emerged as a political category of struggle with a distinct moral quality and vitality. This book explores the work of Black intellectual-activists of the first half of the twentieth century, including Hubert Harrison and W. E. B. Du Bois, that took a pro-Japan stance to articulate the connection between local and global dimensions of antiracism. Turning to two places rarely seen as a part of the Black experience, Japan and Okinawa, the book also presents the accounts of a group of Japanese scholars shaping the Black studies movement in post-surrender Japan and multiracial coalition-building in U.S.-occupied Okinawa during the height of the Vietnam War which brought together local activists, peace activists, and antiracist and antiwar GIs. Together these cases of Afro-Asian solidarity make known political discourses and projects that reworked the concept of race to become a wellspring of aspiration for a new society.

The New Negro

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The New Negro by Alain Locke Book Summary:

Part I, The Negro renaissance: The New Negro; Negro Art and America; The Negro in American Literature; Negro Youth speaks; Fiction; Poetry; Drama; Music; The Negro digs up his Past; Part II, The New Negro in a New World: The Negro Pioneers; The New frontage on American Life; The New Scene; The Negro and the American Tradition; Worlds of Color

"Look for Me All Around You"

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"Look for Me All Around You" by Cyril V. Briggs,Amy Ashwood Garvey,Frank R. Crosswaith,Amy Jacques Garvey,Claude McKay,W. A. Domingo,Hubert H. Harrison,Otto E. Huiswoud,Eulalie Spence,Eric D. Walrond,Richard B. Moore Book Summary:

This anthology is the first to fully integrate the political and literary writings of Anglophone Caribbean authors in the Harlem Renaissance.

The Negro and the Nation

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The Negro and the Nation by Hubert H Harrison Book Summary:

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Holding Aloft the Banner of Ethiopia

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Holding Aloft the Banner of Ethiopia by Winston James Book Summary:

A major history of the impact of Caribbean migration to the United States. Marcus Garvey, Claude McKay, Claudia Jones, C.L.R. James, Stokely Carmichael, Louis Farakhan--the roster of immigrants from the Caribbean who have made a profound impact on the development of radical politics in the United States is extensive. In this magisterial and lavishly illustrated work, Winston James focuses on the twentieth century's first waves of immigrants from the Caribbean and their contribution to political dissidence in America. Examining the way in which the characteristics of the societies they left shaped their perceptions of the land to which they traveled, Winston James draws sharp differences between Hispanic and English-speaking arrivals. He explores the interconnections between the Cuban independence struggle, Puerto Rican nationalism, Afro-American feminism, and black communism in the first turbulent decades of the twentieth century. He also provides fascinating insights into the impact of Puerto Rican radicalism in New York City and recounts the remarkable story of Afro-Cuban radicalism in Florida.

Emancipation of a Black Atheist

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Emancipation of a Black Atheist by D. K. Evans Book Summary:

Great journeys often start with a single question. For D. K. Evans, a newly married professional in the Christian-dominated South, that question was, "Why Do I Believe in God?" That simple query led him on a years-long search to better understand the nature of religion and faith, particularly as it applies to the Black community. While many taking such a journey today might immerse themselves in the writing of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens, Evans took inspiration not only from John Henrik Clarke, Yosef-Ben Jochannan, Hubert Harrison, and John G. Jackson, champions of a rich Black tradition of challenging religious orthodoxy, but also from many others in his own community who had similarly come to question their core religious beliefs. While this journey eventually led him to discount the notion of God, he calls on all to ask their own questions, particularly those within the Black community who act on blind faith. While their own journey might not lead to his truth, he acknowledges, that is the only way they will ever emancipate themselves from the truths thrust on them by others and arrive at their most important truth—their own.

Whiting Up

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Whiting Up by Marvin McAllister Book Summary:

In the early 1890s, black performer Bob Cole turned blackface minstrelsy on its head with his nationally recognized whiteface creation, a character he called Willie Wayside. Just over a century later, hiphop star Busta Rhymes performed a whiteface supercop in his hit music video "Dangerous." In this sweeping work, Marvin McAllister explores the enduring tradition of "whiting up," in which African American actors, comics, musicians, and even everyday people have studied and assumed white racial identities. Not to be confused with racial "passing" or derogatory notions of "acting white," whiting up is a deliberate performance strategy designed to challenge America's racial and political hierarchies by transferring supposed markers of whiteness to black bodies--creating unexpected intercultural alliances even as it sharply critiques racial stereotypes. Along with conventional theater, McAllister considers a variety of other live performance modes, including weekly promenading rituals, antebellum cakewalks, solo performance, and standup comedy. For over three centuries, whiting up as allowed African American artists to appropriate white cultural production, fashion new black identities through these "white" forms, and advance our collective ability to locate ourselves in others.

Radical Moves

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Radical Moves by Lara Putnam Book Summary:

In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the cane fields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black-internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century. From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or "jazzing," writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created--from Marcus Garvey's UNIA to "regge" dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis's worldwide fandom--still echoes in the present.

Race War!

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Race War! by Gerald Horne Book Summary:

Japan’s lightning march across Asia during World War II was swift and brutal. Nation after nation fell to Japanese soldiers. How were the Japanese able to justify their occupation of so many Asian nations? And how did they find supporters in countries they subdued and exploited? Race War! delves into submerged and forgotten history to reveal how European racism and colonialism were deftly exploited by the Japanese to create allies among formerly colonized people of color. Through interviews and original archival research on five continents, Gerald Horne shows how race played a key—and hitherto ignored—;role in each phase of the war. During the conflict, the Japanese turned white racism on its head portraying the war as a defense against white domination in the Pacific. We learn about the reverse racial hierarchy practiced by the Japanese internment camps, in which whites were placed at the bottom of the totem pole, under the supervision of Chinese, Korean, and Indian guards—an embarrassing example of racial payback that was downplayed by the defeated Japanese and the humiliated Europeans and Euro-Americans. Focusing on the microcosmic example of Hong Kong but ranging from colonial India to New Zealand and the shores of the U.S., Gerald Horne radically retells the story of the war. From racist U.S. propaganda to Black Nationalist open support of Imperial Japan, information about the effect of race on U.S. and British policy is revealed for the first time. This revisionist account of the war draws connections between General Tojo, Malaysian freedom fighters, and Elijah Muhammed of the Nation of Islam and shows how white racism encouraged and enabled Japanese imperialism. In sum, Horne demonstrates that the retreat of white supremacy was not only driven by the impact of the Cold War and the energized militancy of Africans and African-Americans but by the impact of the Pacific War as well, as a chastened U.S. and U.K. moved vigorously after this conflict to remove the conditions that made Japan's success possible.

African-American Pioneers in Anthropology

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African-American Pioneers in Anthropology by Ira E. Harrison,Faye V. Harrison Book Summary:

This pathbreaking collection of intellectual biographies is the first to probe the careers of thirteen early African-American anthropologists, detailing both their achievements and their struggle with the latent and sometimes blatant racism of the times. Invaluable to historians of anthropology, this collection will also be useful to readers interested in African-American studies and biography. The lives and work of: Caroline Bond Day, Zora Neale Hurston, Louis Eugene King, Laurence Foster, W. Montague Cobb, Katherine Dunham, Ellen Irene Diggs, Allison Davis, St. Clair Drake, Arthur Huff Fauset, William S. Willis Jr., Hubert Barnes Ross, Elliot Skinner

Against Wind and Tide

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Against Wind and Tide by Ousmane K. Power-Greene Book Summary:

Against Wind and Tide tells the story of African American’s battle against the American Colonization Society (ACS), founded in 1816 with the intention to return free blacks to its colony Liberia. Although ACS members considered free black colonization in Africa a benevolent enterprise, most black leaders rejected the ACS, fearing that the organization sought forced removal. As Ousmane K. Power-Greene’s story shows, these African American anticolonizationists did not believe Liberia would ever be a true “black American homeland.” In this study of anticolonization agitation, Power-Greene draws on newspapers, meeting minutes, and letters to explore the concerted effort on the part of nineteenth century black activists, community leaders, and spokespersons to challenge the American Colonization Society’s attempt to make colonization of free blacks federal policy. The ACS insisted the plan embodied empowerment. The United States, they argued, would never accept free blacks as citizens, and the only solution to the status of free blacks was to create an autonomous nation that would fundamentally reject racism at its core. But the activists and reformers on the opposite side believed that the colonization movement was itself deeply racist and in fact one of the greatest obstacles for African Americans to gain citizenship in the United States. Power-Greene synthesizes debates about colonization and emigration, situating this complex and enduring issue into an ever broader conversation about nation building and identity formation in the Atlantic world.

Heidegger

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Heidegger by Hubert L. Dreyfuss Book Summary:

Martin Heidegger is known for rethinking the western understanding of what it means to be (a thing, a person, an institution, etc). Although this may seem to be an abstract, specialized, philosophical project, it has turned out to have profound implications for many aspects of contemporary life. The list of those whom Heidegger's work has decisively influenced reads like a roster of the major thinkers of the 20th century: Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jurgen Habermas, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Richard Rorty, Charles Taylor and Pierre Bourdieu. This book includes pieces by the above authors who have written essays on Heidegger's philosophy, as well as the best examples of the work of a new generation who have been attempting to put Heidegger's thought into an idiomatic English which captures the phenomena to which Heidegger sought to call our attention, and to draw out the implications of Heidegger's work for the current philosophical scene. These essays show how Heidegger opened up new approaches to central questions in the philosophy of language, mind, action, and technology.

Blacks In and Out of the Left

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Blacks In and Out of the Left by Michael C. Dawson Book Summary:

The radical black left has largely disappeared from the struggle for equality and justice. Michael Dawson examines the causes and consequences, and argues that the conventional left has failed to take race seriously as a force in reshaping American institutions and civil society. Black politics needs to find its way back to its radical roots.